Curriculum

Our 68-hour course curriculum takes approximately 24 months to complete. 

Year One

  • ATR 500 - Foundations in Athletic Training
  • This course will cover the history of athletic training and the various professional organizations that are involved in certification, licensure, and accreditation.  The role and scope of the practice of athletic training will be discussed as well as the athletic trainer’s role in the overall care of the physically active.  One semester hour.
  • ATR 501 - Human Gross Anatomy
  • Human Gross Anatomy includes lectures and cadaver lab instructions and dissection, in addition to clinical correlations and radiographic anatomy, providing students with in-depth training and experience in head-to-toe human gross anatomy and radiographic imaging pertinent to medical practice.  Three lecture hours and three lab hours.  Four semester hours.
  • ATR 502 - Clinical Skills in Athletic Training
  • This course will cover the primary skills needed to evaluate musculoskeletal injuries. Topics will include basic evaluation procedures (SOAP), taping and wrapping techniques, the selection, fitting, the construction of splints and bracing, and goniometry. Techniques used to monitor environmental conditions will also be discussed. Two semester hours.
  • ATR 504 - Kinesiology
  • This course provides a foundation for the practice of physical rehabilitation.  The structural and functional anatomy of the musculoskeletal system is applied to the study of human movement.  The course includes both classroom and laboratory instruction with emphasis on movement and function of the upper extremities, axial skeleton, and lower extremities.  Normal and abnormal posture and gait, as well as an introduction to motor control, are included as a part of this course.  Three hours lecture and three hours lab.  Four semester hours.
  • ATR 505 - Emergency Care for Healthcare Professionals
  • This course is designed to allow students to investigate the foundations of acute and emergency care principles critical to athletic trainers in pre-hospital care. Students will develop problem-solving, critical thinking and skills necessary to appropriately apply emergency care principles in a variety of settings. Two lecture hours and three lab hours. Three semester hours.
  • ATR 515 - Clinical Education I
  • First in a series of 5 integrated clinical education courses in the MSAT curriculum. This series of courses will focus on clinical practice and/or collaborative practice (inter-professional education, civic engagement, etc.). Students will work in teams, each with a clinical faculty member/ preceptor and/or an academic faculty member, to observe patient interactions, apply skills, demonstrate clinical problem-solving and assume professional roles in various patient care settings (based on their level of clinical experience). Each semester, students will be expected to demonstrate skills and knowledge gained from the current and previous coursework. This course focuses on the acute and emergency care of injuries and impairments. The bulk of this course is completed at affiliated clinical facilities during 8 weeks (September-November) of the 2nd semester of the first year for a total of 64 hours of clinical experience (~8 hours/week). Students are expected to demonstrate content knowledge and competency with clinical skills learned in semesters 1 and 2.  One Semester hour. 
  • ATR 516 - Clinical Education II
  • Second in a series of 5 integrated clinical education courses in the MSAT curriculum. This series of courses will focus on clinical practice and/or collaborative practice (inter-professional education, civic engagement, etc.). Students will work in teams, each with a clinical faculty member/ preceptor and/or an academic faculty member, to observe patient interactions, apply skills, demonstrate clinical problem-solving and assume professional roles in various patient care settings (based on their level of clinical experience). Each semester, students will be expected to demonstrate skills and knowledge gained from the current and previous coursework. This course focuses on the evaluation of the upper extremity and basic therapeutic interventions.  The bulk of this course is completed at affiliated clinical facilities during 10 weeks (February-April) of the 3rd semester of the first year for a total of 120 hours of clinical experience (~12 hours/week).  Students are expected to demonstrate content knowledge and competency with clinical skills learned in semesters 1 through 3.  Two semester hours.
  • ATR 540 - Musculoskeletal Exam & Diagnosis I
  • This course will discuss the principles and structures associated with musculoskeletal examinations of the upper extremities. The anatomy of the upper extremities will be reviewed, mechanics of injury, mechanisms of injury analyzed, advanced concepts in examination will be discussed, and skills necessary to accurately examine related musculoskeletal injuries will be practiced. Evidence based practice with regard to examination techniques will be a focal point of the course. Extensive time will be spent practicing skills in various laboratory activities. Four semester hours.
  • ATR 541 - Evidence-Based Practice
  • This course is designed to introduce students to the basic information and skills required to understand, and apply research in the clinical practice with consideration given to clinician skill and patient preference. Students will learn to Students will learn how to: (a) ask a focused and answerable clinical question; (b) search for the best available evidence; (c) critically appraise the evidence; (d) apply the results to clinical practices; (e) evaluate the outcomes of clinical practices. Instruction will include discussions related to types of research, research design, common measures and instruments used in health care, and the skills necessary to critically evaluate and apply research to the clinical setting. Three semester hours
  • ATR 545 - Musculoskeletal Exam & Diagnosis II
  • Students will learn the principles and structure of musculoskeletal examination techniques for the lower extremity and lumbosacral spine. The anatomy of the lower extremities and lumbosacral spine will be reviewed, mechanisms of injury analyzed, advanced concepts in examination will be discussed, and skills necessary to accurately examine related musculoskeletal injuries will be practiced. Documentation in athletic training will be discussed and practiced. Evidence based practice with regard to examination techniques will be a focal point of the course. Extensive time will be spent practicing skills in various laboratory activities. Four semester hours.
  • ATR 562 - Therapeutic Interventions I
  • This course will explore the application of electrical, mechanical and infrared modalities used to assist the body’s natural healing process.  The healing process and theories of pain control will be discussed in-depth.  This course will also explore the concepts of therapeutic exercise as it relates to the athletic training profession.  Three lecture hours and three lab hours.  Four semester hours.
  • ATR 563 - Therapeutic Interventions II
  • This course will provide an in-depth study of theories and principles used in evidence-based therapeutic rehabilitation programs. Didactic and laboratory experience will allow students to learn and apply theories in principals to design evidence-based therapeutic rehabilitations programs that will return patients from injury or dysfunction improving health-related quality of life. Three lectures hours. Three lab hours. Four semester hours
  • ATR 565 - Musculoskeletal Exam and Diagnosis III
  • This course will address the anatomy of and injuries associated with the head, neck, face and thorax.  Considerable time will be dedicated to head injuries with specific attention given to diagnosing and managing concussions.  Two lecture hours and two lab hours.  Two semester hours.

Year Two

  • ATR 600 - Health Promotion
  • This course is designed to introduce students to prevention and wellness for individual and family across the lifespan. Students will learn basic health promotion concepts and theories, in addition to the environmental, sociocultural, familial, spiritual, and religious influences on development throughout the life. Specific guidelines for assessment and interventions will be discussed within the context of development and the lifespan. Two semester hours.
  • ATR 615 - Clinical Education III
  • Third in a series of five integrated clinical education courses in the MSAT curriculum. This series of courses will focus on clinical practice and/or collaborative practice (inter-professional education, civic engagement, etc.). Students will work in teams, each with a clinical faculty member/ preceptor and/or an academic faculty member, to observe patient interactions, apply skills, demonstrate clinical problem-solving and assume professional roles in various patient care settings (based on their level of clinical experience). Each semester, students will be expected to demonstrate skills and knowledge gained from the current and previous coursework. This course focuses on injury prevention, the evaluation of the Lower extremity, torso, head and basic therapeutic interventions. The bulk of this course is completed at affiliated clinical facilities during 10 weeks (May-August) of the 1st semester of the second year for a total of 120 hours of clinical experience (~12 hours/week). Students are expected to demonstrate content knowledge and competency with clinical skills learned in previous semesters. Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of ATR 516, good standing in MSAT Program.  Two semester hours.
  • ATR 616 - Clinic Education IV
  • Fourth in a series of five integrated clinical education courses in the MSAT curriculum. This series of courses will focus on clinical practice and/or collaborative practice (inter-professional education, civic engagement, etc.). Students will work in teams, each with a faculty member/ preceptor and/or an academic faculty member, to engage in patient interactions, apply skills, demonstrate clinical problem-solving and assume professional roles in various patient care settings (based on their level of clinical experience). Each semester, students will be expected to demonstrate skills and knowledge gained from the current and previous coursework. This course focuses on the evaluation of general medical conditions, health promotion, and integration of skills and patient care. The first 10 weeks of the semester students will attend class on campus and weekly clinical experience rounds with area physicians and at the Mel Leaman Free clinics for ~5 hours per week. The bulk of this course is completed at affiliated clinical facilities during a 4-week mini immersion (November-December) of the 2nd semester of the second year for a total of 160 hours of clinical experience (~40 hours/week). Students are expected to demonstrate content knowledge and competency with clinical skills learned in previous semesters. Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of ATR 615, good standing in MSAT Program.  Three semester hours.
  • ATR 617 - Clinical Education V
  • Fifth in a series of five integrated clinical education courses in the MSAT curriculum. This series of courses will focus on clinical practice and/or collaborative practice (inter-professional education, civic engagement, etc.). Students will be placed at an affiliated clinical site to engage in patient interactions, apply skills, demonstrate clinical problem-solving and assume professional roles in various patient care settings under the supervision of a preceptor. Each semester, students will be expected to demonstrate skills and knowledge gained from the current and previous coursework. This course focuses on the transition to professional practice and professional development. The bulk of this course is completed at affiliated clinical facilities during a 10-week clinical immersion (January-April) of the 3rd semester of the second year for a total of 400 hours of clinical experience (~40 hours/week). Students are expected to demonstrate content knowledge and competency with clinical skills learned in previous semesters. Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of ATR 616, good standing in MSAT Program.  Five semester hours.
  • ATR 618 - Nutrition and Exercise Prescription
  • An in-depth study of the influence of nutrition and exercise on performance, injury, activities of daily living, and quality of life. This course will focus on nutritional assessment, fitness assessment, and the synthesis of the information gained into appropriate, evidence-based nutrition and exercise programs. The programs designed will be developed using principles related to cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and endurance, body composition, flexibility, and balance. Consideration will be given to diets and ergogenic aids. Didactic and laboratory experience will allow students to learn and apply theories in laboratory and field assessment. Three lecture hours. Three lab hours. Four semester hours.
  • ATR 640 Advanced Clinical Skills
  • This course introduces the student to advanced clinical procedures often used to evaluate or treat dysfunction of body structures. Topics will include imaging (CT, MRI, PET), Phlebotomy, IV, Suturing, Joint Aspiration and Injections, Casting, and Orthotics. One hour lecture. One semester hour.
  • ATR 651 - Research in Athletic Training
  • This course is designed to introduce students to the basic information and skills required to conduct research. Students will learn how to discriminate among the types of research, research designs, and statistical analysis. Additionally, students will learn how to integrate findings within the context of the current literature and the skills necessary to write and publish knowledge that contributes directly to evidence-based practice.  Three semester hours.
  • ATR 660 - Seminar in Athletic Training
  • This course will aid to prepare the AT student to transition to professional practice with emphasis on test-taking strategies and review for the Board of Certification (BOC) exam. Students will critically reflect on their clinical immersion experiences and prepare to transition from student to professional.  Three semester hours.
  • ATR 680 - General Medical Conditions and Pharmacotherapy
  • The course will discuss causes, recognition, and treatments for a host of diseases or disorders affecting those that are physically active. As part of the treatment process, pharmacokinetics will also be discussed regarding what roles various drugs may play in the recovery process. Three hours lecture and two hours lab.  Four semester hours.
  • ATR 683 - Administration and Leadership
  • This course analyzes elements of organization and administration of athletic training programs in a variety of settings. Students will examine and critique components of: leadership, health-informatics, record keeping & data collection, insurance and care plans, billing & reimbursement, budgeting & operational procedures, risk management, legal issues, ethical practice, governing bodies, human resources, and employment issues. Issues addressing transition to practice and professional socialization will also be debated.  Three semester hours.


Emory, Va. Campus: P.O. Box 947, Emory, Va. 24327 (map)    276.944.4121
Marion, Va. Campus: 565 Radio Hill Rd., Marion, Va. 24354 (map)    276.944.6342 ·  276.781.7200