Engelhardt Discusses Appalachian Food, Culture March 19 at Emory & Henry

 
  Board of Visitors Lounge - Van Dyke Hall
A study of the foods of Appalachia can provide nourishment to an engaging discussion about race, class, gender, region, and, of course, food.

A study of the foods of Appalachia can provide nourishment to an engaging discussion about race, class, gender, region, and, of course, food.

That is the intention of Elizabeth Engelhardt, the 2015 Emory & Henry College Reynolds Lecturer, who will lead a discussion of the emerging field of Appalachian food studies on Thursday, March 19. Her lecture will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Board of Visitors Lounge of the E&H Van Dyke Center.

Her lecture, entitled “Appalachian Chicken and Waffles: An Improbable Tale of Belgian Waffles and Cast Iron Fried Chicken,” will focus on the history, culture and development of the two dishes. At the same time, she will explore the ways that a study of Appalachian food can correct the excesses of southern food fetishism.

Engelhardt was appointed the John Shelton Reed Distinguished Professor of Southern Studies at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill in 2015. Previously, she was a professor of American Studies and Women’s and Gender Studies at the University of Texas in Austin.

She is the author of “A Mess of Greens: Southern Gender and Southern Food,” which combines the study of food culture with gender studies and uses perspectives from historical, literary, environmental and American studies. The book examines what southern women’s choices about food say about race, class, gender and social power.

The Richard Joshua Reynolds Lectureship, which is free and open to the public, is Emory & Henry preeminent endowed lectureship in the humanities.



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