Abraham Awarded Salzburg Seminar Fellowship

Posted on: Friday, February 14th, 2014
by Brent Treash
The chief information officer and director of the library at Emory & Henry College has been awarded a fellowship by the Appalachian College Association to attend the Salzburg Global Seminar in Salzburg, Austria, where she will participate in discussions related to preserving the lessons from the Holocaust as a way of preventing genocide in the future.

The chief information officer and director of the library at Emory & Henry College has been awarded a fellowship by the Appalachian College Association to attend the Salzburg Global Seminar in Salzburg, Austria, where she will participate in discussions related to preserving the lessons from the Holocaust as a way of preventing genocide in the future.

Lorraine Abraham, the director of Emory & Henry’s Kelly Library, will participate in the symposium with an eye toward developing a “virtual toolbox” to resources dealing with the Holocaust that are available in the library, on the Internet, and at Virginia and U.S. Holocaust museums. This electronic resource will include links to multimedia digital content, first-person interviews with survivors, bibliographies, oral histories and strategies for incorporating the information into courses.

“The ‘virtual toolbox’ will enable ACA educators and librarians to locate the information resources to place the Holocaust in the context of contemporary instances of genocide and crimes against humanity,” Abraham said.

The week-long seminar, which will be held in June, challenges current and future leaders to develop creative ideas for solving global problems and has brought participants from 150 countries since its founding in 1947. The seminar will be held at Schloss Leopoldskron, an 18th century castle in Salzburg.

Abraham’s fellowship covers all of her travel and living expenses during the seminar, which convenes educators, civil society leaders, museum directors, policy makers, public officials and others working in the field of Holocaust education and genocide prevention.

Participating in the symposium provides Abraham with the opportunity to explore strategies for disseminating information of the realities of the Holocaust to current and future students while preserving the intellectual freedom of library patrons.

“With the success of Emory & Henry’s growing international studies program,” Abraham said, “we need to ensure that our students have a thorough understanding of the history and relevance of genocide and Holocaust studies as they travel and become global citizens and representatives of our institution.”