Emory & Henry College Professors Ranked Among Top 25 in Nation

Posted on: Thursday, April 17th, 2014
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by Brent Treash
For the fourth consecutive year, a survey conducted by CBS Money Watch has ranked Emory & Henry College professors among the top 25 faculties in the nation.

For the fourth consecutive year, a survey conducted by CBS Money Watch has ranked Emory & Henry College professors among the top 25 faculties in the nation.

Emory & Henry professors ranked No. 20 nationwide in the survey, which was conducted by The Center for College Affordability and Productivity. The Center crunched the figures from RateMyProfessors.com, which maintains the Internet’s largest collection of college professor rankings.

“This ranking reinforces what we have long known about Emory & Henry professors; they are among the best in the nation.” said Dirk Moore, spokesperson for the College. “That notion has been supported for many years by the remarkable success of our students and a long list of state and national recognitions for our professors.”

This ranking reinforces what we have long known about Emory & Henry professors Dirk Moore
Director of Public Relatons

Award Winning Faculty

Over the last 25 years, Emory & Henry professors have won 16 state and national awards for teaching excellence. Those awards include eight Virginia and U.S. Professor of the Year awards from the Carnegie Foundation, which has honored Emory & Henry more than any other college or university in Virginia for teaching excellence.

Topping the list of best professors was Oklahoma Wesleyan University. The list includes several other nationally ranked liberal arts colleges and universities, including Wellesley College in Massachusetts (No. 7), Bryn Mawr College in Pennsylvania (No. 9), Sewanee – University of the South in Tennessee (No. 19), and Sarah Lawrence College in New York (No. 22).

CBS News Money Watch, which featured the rankings on its website, noted that no Ivy League schools cracked the top 25 list, which was dominated by liberal arts institutions.

“That’s not surprising considering smaller student bodies translate into smaller classes, greater hands-on learning opportunities, and, most importantly, more individual attention,” according to Money Watch.