After Thousands of Hours of Student Work, Five-year Project Nears Completion

Posted on: Friday, January 29th, 2016 by Brent Treash
Nearly 100 students logged thousands of hours organizing museum documents and records into an accessible physical and online database archive to preserve the history of Newbern, Pulaski County, and the region.

After nearly five years of work, Emory & Henry College students are about to complete a major regional project focused on the holdings of the Wilderness Road Regional Museum in Newbern, Va.

Nearly 100 students logged thousands of hours organizing museum documents and records into an accessible physical and online database archive to preserve the history of Newbern, Pulaski County, and the region. The project was undertaken with guidance from professor Tal Stanley (E&H class of 1983), a native of the nearby town of Dublin who serves as director of the Program in Civic Innovation and of the Appalachian Center for Civic Life.

To commemorate this accomplishment, Nathan Fishell, an E&H senior, has created a webpage dedicated to the museum, the work conducted by the college and discoveries made over the years.

Fishell completed the project as part of his capstone work in civic innovation. The project also allowed him to use his expertise in his other major, mass communications.

In developing this web page, Fishell drew on several project e-portfolios developed by other students during the fall semester as a part of their study in a college course for first-semester students, Transitions, but the webpage highlights the work accomplished throughout the life of the project.  Visitors to the site may see and hear from several folks who have been active in the Newbern Project since it began.

“The Newbern Project is a remarkable undertaking. Through it, we are prototyping a new approach to civic engagement at Emory & Henry,” Stanley said.  “The project marks a significant milestone in Emory & Henry’s legacy of joining education and civic work, at the same time providing a rare resource to the people of Pulaski County and Southwest Virginia.”

Stanley hopes the project will open other opportunities—for learning and service for the Wilderness Road Regional Museum, Emory & Henry College and the College’s Appalachian Center for Civic Life, as well as for citizens, lifelong learners, professional scholars and civic leaders.

The Newbern Project was supported by the Corella and Bertram Bonner Foundation in Princeton, New Jersey, the Appalachian College Association, and Emory & Henry College. 

The completion of the project is expected during the summer of 2016.


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