E&H Receives $221,000 in Support of Health Sciences Simulation Lab

Posted on: Thursday, June 9th, 2016 by Brent Treash
Manikins that are capable of speaking, coughing, bleeding and even vomiting will now be a part of the educational experience for students at the Emory & Henry College School of Health Sciences thanks to support from the Virginia Tobacco Regional Revitalization Commission.

Manikins that are capable of speaking, coughing, bleeding and even vomiting will now be a part of the educational experience for students at the Emory & Henry College School of Health Sciences thanks to support from the Virginia Tobacco Regional Revitalization Commission.

The Commission has awarded Emory & Henry $221,590 in support of equipment for an Inter-professional Clinical Simulation Lab at the School of Health Sciences in Marion. The manikins, known as high-fidelity patient simulators, can manifest the signs of illness as well as other vital signs, such as blood pressure, temperature, breathing and heart rate.

Valuable Care Opportunity

The use of the manikins is effective in providing students with opportunities to assess and treat patients with serious or emergent medical conditions that are often associated with dangerous changes in vital signs. The manikins “provide students with valuable patient care experience prior to their clinical rotations in local healthcare facilities,” according to Lou Fincher, dean of the School of Health Sciences.

The use of manikins will be combined with instruction using people (standardized patients) who are trained to portray the clinical presentation of a specific illness or disease state, providing a unique simulation environment for students. The E&H simulation lab also will include an emphasis on rural health care, training students to address the unique economic, cultural and social factor that can negatively impact the delivery of patient care.

The Inter-professional Clinical Simulation Lab will provide training for students of physical therapy and occupational therapy and advanced practice for students of the physician assistant program slated to begin in 2018.

Simulated patient scenarios provide a safe and controlled learning environment for students to improve their communication, patient care and clinical decision-making skills Lou FincherDean of the School of Health Sciences

The Tobacco Commission grant will be matched by money from the Smyth County Community Foundation. The funding is expected to be in place this year to allow for the purchase of the equipment and the completion of the lab prior to the start of the fall semester.

The E&H simulation lab will provide approximately 4,300 square feet of space and will include seven standardized patient rooms, three high-fidelity patient simulator rooms, a control room, a student debriefing room, and a standardized patient meeting room.

*The file photo featured above is not necessarily the actual high-fidelity patient simulators that will be used by the program.


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