• Emory & Henry students draw outside of the Memorial Chapel on a sunny day
  • Emory & Henry Religion Students and Faculty pose for a photo

Find yourself and others with religion and philosophy.

Religion intersects with all of life.

The academic study of religion is a core element of liberal arts education. It is our intention that students come to a deeper understanding of religion as a lived enterprise that is both personal and corporate in nature, and that relies on both assumptions and practice. The Religion Program approaches the study of religion from the point of inquiry of what it means to be human. In doing so, our courses pursue investigations of how people have thought about and lived out aspects of religious life across time and space. Our faculty begin from the place of taking the religious presuppositions and practical manifestations of religious life seriously. Students in our program engage different theories of religion and methods for studying religion while growing in awareness of important debates in the academic study of religion.

Engaging students in critical and reflective thought.

Providing you with techniques of sound reasoning, philosophy majors go on to study law, medicine, religion, and are well prepared for applying to graduate school. At Emory & Henry, our courses include ethics, argumentation and debate, techniques in reasoning, philosophy of religion, jurisprudence and political philosophy.

Degrees

  • Bachelor of Arts, Philosophy

    To engage students in critical and reflective inquiry; to prepare students for graduate study or for a number of vocational fields.

  • Minor, Philosophy

    A student may minor in philosophy by completing 101, 211, 212, 231, and two other philosophy courses chosen in consultation with the department chair.

  • Bachelor of Arts, Religion

    To investigate religious thought and action within a balanced context of approaches, utilizing biblical, theological, literary, and historical insights.

  • Minor, Religion

    A student may minor in religion by completing 131, 132; 111, 212, 213 or 314; 310 and two electives from the department selected in consultation with the department chair.

Student Research

  • <h4 class="lw_blurbs_title">White Evangelicals and the 2016 Presidential Election</h4><div class="lw_blurbs_body"><p> Senior Religion major Jacob Dye is hard at work on his senior honors thesis, tentatively titled “Has the Donald ‘Trumped’ Jesus? White Evangelical Christians and the 2016 Presidential Election.” He is exploring data related to the overwhelming support from white Evangelicals for President Trump and is discussing that support in light of theological defenses of it from evangelical leaders as well as critiques of that support from other Christian voices. Jacob plans to attend Duke University Divinity School next year to pursue a M.Div. degree.</p></div>