• Sociology students studying abroad in Stockholm, studying gender equality in Swedish society.
    Sociology students studying abroad in Stockholm, studying gender equality in Swedish society.
  • Students participate in Tunnel of Oppression, an MLK Day event, highlighting inequality in American society.
    Students participate in Tunnel of Oppression, an MLK Day event, highlighting inequality in American society.

We do research in our service and service through our research.

The Department of Sociology at Emory & Henry offers students the chance to see America and the world from new perspectives. With a strong tradition of undergraduate research and community engagement, the department emphasizes active learning to prepare students to address social issues with a strong educational foundation.

Degrees

  • Bachelor of Arts, Sociology

    To introduce students to the theoretical and empirical foundations of sociology and develop their skills in critical evaluation, data collection, and data analysis in order to prepare them for careers in business, policy analysis, program evaluation, or human services as well as for continued study of sociology in graduate programs across the country.

  • Bachelor of Arts, Sociology- Crime and Society

    To provide students with coursework and practical experience in preparation for graduate study in criminology and/or careers in law enforcement, victim advocacy, and related fields.

  • Minor, Sociology

    A student may minor in sociology by completing 101, 330, 334, and three additional courses in sociology approved by the department chair.

Student Research

  • <h4 class="lw_blurbs_title">Portrait of a Tipping Point: Karl Marx and Capitalism in Crisis</h4><div class="lw_blurbs_body"><p> In his senior honors thesis, <strong>Zachary McKenney ’10</strong>, a political science and sociology double major, explores Karl Marx’s account of the collapse of capitalist economies. He shows that even though the fall of communist countries in eastern Europe in the late 1980s was widely taken to be “proof” that Marx’s economic predictions were false, the 2008 economic crisis was actually caused by critical failures of the capital market systems that Marx anticipated long ago. He argues that Marx’s predictions were in fact very accurate and offers some thoughts on why Marx’s economic predictions can be prescient even if his political conclusions have proven to be problematic. Zak is currently enrolled in a Ph.D. program in political theory.</p></div>