The Bartlett-Crowe Field Station is an outdoor laboratory where Emory & Henry students conduct a wide variety of projects, from identifying soil microbes to mapping crayfish burrows.  

Students in classes including Environmental Monitoring, Ecology, Wildlife Monitoring, and Physical Geology visit the Field Station to carry out lab activities.  

  • Weather and air quality monitoring

    The Bartlett-Crowe Field Station has a weather station and a pm-10 air particulate sampler.  Students collect particulate matter samples and correlate them with wind patterns to help identify major sources of particulate air pollution.   Keep reading
  • Water quality monitoring

    Students measure water quality parameters including temperature, conductivity, pH, dissolved oxygen and nutrient concentrations.   Keep reading
  • Phenology Trail

    Phenology is the study of the timing of plant and animal lifecycle events as they relate to seasonal changes in climate and other habitat factors.  Students at E&H are establishing a phenology trail, where visitors are invited to make observations and take photos, then upload these into a Field Station database.  Over time, we will develop a better understanding of how events like wildflower blooms and the onset of spring peepers relate to our changing climate.     Keep reading
  • Ecological succession.

    Students assist with a prescribed burn as part of a study on ecological succession.  By burning a few sections of field every other year, we are developing a study site with varying ages.  Comparisons can then be made in plant cover, soil chemistry and microbes, invasive species, mammal and bird populations. Keep reading
  • Seeing Blue?

    Emory & Henry students study burrowing crayfish at the Bartlett-Crowe Field Station. Keep reading
  • Field Station Awarded National Grant to Create Strategic Plan

    Emory & Henry College has been awarded a planning grant by the National Science Foundation (NSF) to develop an inaugural 5-year strategic plan for the Bartlett-Crowe Field Station. Keep reading