RN-BSN Nursing Handbook

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

I.Emory & Henry College

a.     Purpose of the Handbook

b.     Emory & Henry College Mission Statement

c.     Emory & Henry College Vision Statement

d.     Emory & Henry College Motto

e.     E&H College School of Health Sciences Educational Facility

f.      E&H College School of Health Sciences Mission Statement                                      

II.  RN – BSN Program

a.     Purpose Statement

b.     Mission Statement

c.     Vision Statement

d.     Philosophy

e.     Theoretical Framework

f.      Goals

g.     Nursing Accreditation

h.     AACN Essentials of Baccalaureate Nursing Education Program Outcomes

i.      Essential Cultural Competencies for Baccalaureate Nursing Education                      

III.   College and School of Health Sciences Policies

a.     Equal Opportunity Policy

b.     Disability Services

c.     Preregistration and Registration for Course

e.     Grade and Grade Points

f.      Change of Grade

g.     Repeating a Course to Improve the Grade

h.     Transcript of Grades

i.      Transfer Credit

j.      Transfer Students

k.     Online Student Privacy Policy

l.      Dismissal from a Course

m.    Withdrawal from a Class

n.     Withdrawal from Emory & Henry College

o.     Leave of Absence

p.     Kelly Library

q.     Information Technology Services Department

r.      Vandalism or Willful Misconduct

s.      Campus Policy & Student Conduct

t.      Academic Policies

u.     Student Records:  Confidentiality and Access

v.     General Policies

w.    Student Complaint Policy

x.     Discrimination and Social Harassment Policy

y.     Discrimination and Harassment Policy

z.     Title VI Hearings

aa.  Policy on Sexual and Gender-based Harassment and Discrimination and Other Forms of Interpersonal Violence (Title IX) 

bb.  Code of Student Conduct

cc.   Security and Acceptable Use of the Campus Network and Technology Policy

IV.   RN-BSN Program-Specific Policies

a.     Admission Requirements

b.     Graduation Requirements

c.     Progression, Retention, Dismissal

d.    Practical Standards for Admission, Progression, Graduation

e.     Expected Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

f.      Reference Format

g.     Confidentiality of Coursework

h.     Academic Honesty in Nursing

i.      Netiquette for Online Courses

APPENDICES

A.    Standards of Professional Nursing Practice

B.    ANA Code of Ethics for Nurses


Emory & Henry College Information

  Purpose of the Handbook

The Emory & Henry College School of Health Sciences RN to BSN Program handbook provides information relative to the School of Health Sciences.  Information in this Nursing Student handbook will apply to the 2019 – 2020 academic year. Emory & Henry College School of Health Sciences and the RN-BSN Program reserves the rights to make changes in offerings, requirements, and regulations consequent to the publication of the handbook.

  Mission Statement

We affirm the Christian faith as our spiritual and moral heritage and encourage all our members to grow in faith as they grow in knowledge.  We believe in the worth of each person’s religious and cultural heritage, inasmuch as that heritage leads to service to others in our region and the larger world.

We affirm the liberal arts as our intellectual foundation and believes that excellence results when everyone actively participates in the educational process.  We challenge all persons to confront historical and contemporary ideas and issues to develop the ability to think critically about all areas of human experience.

These traditions provide the context for our pursuit of excellence, as we engage a diverse group of well-qualified men and women in educational experiences that lead to lives of service, productive careers, and global citizenship.

Inspired by the motto “Increase in Excellence,” the first faculty challenged students to grow and develop intellectually, spiritually and physically.  Today, our mission continues to focus on students as they follow a path of intellectual and spiritual growth on their way to successful futures.  That mission, in turn, is extended to others through a broad program of active engagement and community service.

You will discover that Emory & Henry is a place of promise made up of warm-hearted, caring people who care about your fulfillment.  This is a community that embraces people from all walks of life as they work together to improve the individual and the world.  We are people with a mission and a long history devoted to transforming lives and increasing excellence.

(Taken from the Emory & Henry College Academic Catalog)

  Vision Statement

Emory & Henry will be a national leader in providing the highest quality liberal arts, graduate, and professional education that combines tradition and innovation as it fulfills our historic commitment to transform lives and to create positive, social change in our region, our nation, and the world.

(Taken from the Emory & Henry College Academic Catalog)

  Motto

Macte Virtute – “Increase in Excellence”

  E&H School of Health Sciences Educational Facilities

School of Health Sciences – The School of Health Sciences was established in 2014 with the goal of preparing compassionate, patient-centered, highly skilled health care professionals who not only provide quality healthcare to their patients, but actively engage in leadership and service opportunities within their professional organizations and communities. The School of Health Sciences offer both undergraduate and graduate programs.

Undergraduate – Exercise Science; Pre-Health; RN-BSN Nursing Program

Graduate – Athletic Training (MSAT); Occupational Therapy (MOT and OTD); Physical Therapy (DPT); and Physician Assistant (MPAS)

  School of Health Sciences Mission Statement

To provide a collaborative, interprofessional culture that prepares highly-competent healthcare professionals who exhibit exemplary professionalism; provide culturally sensitive, mindful, patient/client-centered healthcare services; and actively contribute to the advancement of their professions and communities through leadership, scholarship, and service.


  RN-BSN Program

  Purpose Statement

The purpose of the Emory & Henry College RN-BSN program is to educate and prepare baccalaureate level nurses to be professional leaders in healthcare in Southwest Virginia and surrounding areas. The nursing curriculum is built with the underpinnings of liberal arts, sciences, and nursing which focus on the nursing process to enhance the pedagogical attainment of nursing knowledge, clinical skills, and a devotion to the nursing profession.

  Nursing Program Mission Statement

The mission of the Emory & Henry College RN-BSN Nursing Program is to provide a holistic approach to educating the future professional nurses in a collaborative, interprofessional culture in preparation for lives of promoting client-centered healing and health to culturally diverse individuals and populations in our communities. The BSN prepared nurse will be actively engaged and contribute to the advancement of the nursing profession through life-long learning, leadership, scholarship, and service.

  Nursing Program Vision Statement

The RN-BSN Program’s vision is identical to the vision of Emory & Henry College, which is: Emory & Henry will be a national leader in providing the highest quality liberal arts, graduate, and professional education that combines tradition and innovation as it fulfills our historic commitment to transform lives and to create positive, social change in our region, our nation, and the world.

  Nursing Program Philosophy

Emory & Henry College is a coeducational, church-related liberal arts college with a commitment in providing education in a caring environment.  The nursing philosophy embodies faculty belief of nursing education and professional practice as recognized through the nursing metaparadigm of person, environment, health, and nursing.  The nursing program embraces the development of the whole person:  ethical, intellectual, moral, physical, psychosocial, and spiritual.  The nursing faculty will provide supportive, individualized awareness to assist students to attain learning goals and self-direction in achieving their professional nursing goals and education.  Students will be active participants in their learning process through collaborative encounters inter-professionally, intra-professionally, and the community to provide evidence-based, patient-centered nursing care.

Professional education is instrumental in the achievement of a focused, specialized level of knowledge with an emphasis in a discipline through a commitment to ethical, social, and scholarly professional standards.  It cultivates the acceptance of accountability for clinical judgment, critical thinking, and decision-making relevant to the level of professional nursing practice.  Nursing education fosters students to promote and provide culturally-competent, ethical, evidence-based, and spiritually appropriate patient-centered care to diverse populations in the community.

 The knowledge of nursing is procured through aesthetic, empirical, ethical, personal, and social knowing. The environment of education promotes scholarly inquiry and enables students to become knowledgeable to care for individuals throughout the lifespan. The education for preparing baccalaureate professional nursing practice is derived from a program of studies in behavioral and physical sciences, humanities, and nursing sciences. Students in the nursing program will be competent practitioners with a variety of skills, ability to make sound clinical judgment based on data and current evidence-based practices, as well as develop respect for the intrinsic worth of human beings, contemplate their own personal values and attitudes, and develop a commitment to the profession of nursing and lifelong learning.

Nursing students at the post-licensure undergraduate baccalaureate level are accountable for their individual learning with the unique potential for advancing the profession of nursing.  Nursing faculty serve as facilitators and mentors in the students’ quest for inquiry and knowledge in the learning environment.  Nursing faculty exhibit behaviors of professionalism as a reflection of the ethical and legal commitment to the scope and standards of nursing practice.

  Theoretical Framework
Theoretical Framework graphic

The theoretical framework for the Emory & Henry College RN-BSN program is based on the nursing metaparadigm concepts of person, health, environment, and nursing.  The definition of metaparadigm is “The concepts that identify the phenomena of central interest to a discipline; the propositions that describe these concepts and their relationships to each other” (Farlex and Partners, 2009).

The four concepts of the metaparadigm provide a holistic view to concentrate on the whole person, the health and welfare of the person, the internal and external environment, and the obligation of the nurse to the person.

Concepts:

  1. Person – The person is regarded as an individual to be treated with dignity, respect, nurtured and valued to maintain the right to make informed decisions concerning their health and well-being. The structure of care encompasses the physical, cultural, mental, social, and spiritual need of the
  2. Health – The health of a person evolves throughout the Health is viewed to comprise the physical, mental, emotional, psychological, social, intellectual, and spiritual wellness of the person. Consideration of these areas is optimal for the benefits and welfare in the outcomes for the person.
  3. Environment – The environment is viewed as the physical space and surroundings which have an impact on the person and can be affected internally and Factors which can influence the environment may include culture, interpersonal relationships, social status, educational level, socioeconomic status, geographical setting, genetics, immune function, and politics, to name a few.
  4. Nursing – The component focuses on the values of service and what the nurse does in providing care for the individual to promote optimal health This involves the development of a relationship with the person, provide a safe and caring environment, determine evidence-based nursing interventions and actions for the provision of care. This is accomplished through the skills, knowledge, communication and collaborations, professional judgement and decision-making, critical thinking skills, and the use of technology which is acquired through education and practice.

  Goals

The goals for the Emory & Henry College RN-BSN program are:

  1. Promote patient-centered care for individuals, families, and community
  2. Promote critical thinking/problem-solving skills in developing and implementing nursing interventions based in evidence-based
  3. Develop leadership proficiencies in collaboration with clients, inter- and intra-professionally, and communities to promote, maintain, and restore health.
  4. Encourage the need for continuing professional enhancement through formal and informal learning
  5. Enhance verbal and written communication skills as a professional nurse to improve engagement with healthcare professionals, patients, families, and communities.
  6. Integrate healthcare informatics and technology into patient care for enhanced patient outcomes.

  Nursing Accreditation

The Emory & Henry College RN-BSN Nursing Program has obtained institutional provisional membership to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) and is in the process of obtaining accreditation from the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE).

  AACN Essentials of Baccalaureate Nursing Education Program Outcomes

Upon completion of the RN-BSN program, the graduate will meet the outcomes for the AACN Essentials of Baccalaureate Nursing education.

Emory & Henry RN – BSN Student Outcomes

 

AACN Essentials of Baccalaureate Nursing Education

Application of knowledge from liberal arts, sciences, and nursing to assimilate and synthesize for health promotion, maintenance, and restoration of the nursing process.

 

I. Liberal Education for Baccalaureate Generalist Nursing Practice

Integrate and apply leadership and management proficiencies within healthcare systems.

 

II. Basic Organizational and Systems Leadership for Quality Care and Patient Safety

Implement provisions of care grounded in evidence-based practice from evaluation and knowledge acquired.

 

III. Scholarship for Evidence-Based Practice

Utilize knowledge of information systems and technology to augment nursing practice to ensure quality patient care is provided.

 

IV. Information Management and Application of Patient Care Technology

Exhibit vision, flexibility, and collaborative abilities to plan and execute quality economical care to clients with varied economic status.

 

V.Healthcare Policy, Finance, and Regulatory Environments

Integrate inter- and intra-professional relationships for collaboration in the delivery of patient-centered care utilizing evidence-based practice with culturally diverse individuals, families, and communities.

 

VI. Interprofessional Communication and Collaboration for Improving Patient Health Outcomes

Evaluate healthcare needs of impoverished populations in the region and collaborate with professionals to plan and execute an intervention which contributes to health and illness prevention.

VII. Clinical Prevention and Population Health

Engage in independent acquisition of knowledge, continual personal and professional growth.

Awareness of issues and healthcare policies affecting nursing and the provision of care.

Assimilate ethical, legal and professional standards based on a holistic perspective into own professional nursing practice.

 

VIII.  Professionalism and Professional Values

Engage in independent acquisition of knowledge, continual personal and professional growth.

Awareness of issues and healthcare policies affecting nursing and the provision of care.

 

IX. Professionalism and Professional Values

Amalgamate, execute, and administer culturally and developmentally appropriate patient-centered care to diverse individuals, families, and communities across the lifespan.

X.  Baccalaureate Generalist Nursing Practice


  Essential Cultural Competencies for Baccalaureate Nursing Education

The BSN graduate will be able to:

Competency

1.   Exhibit perception of culture and cultural competence in practice.

2.   Assess similarities and differences in values, beliefs, and practices among and within diverse populations.

3.   Expound on the relationships among cultural, ecological, genetic, pharmacologic, and physiological factors.

4.   Assimilate social and cultural assessment data (including language and health literacy) in planning, implementing and evaluating care.

 

I. Apply knowledge of social and cultural factors that affect nursing and health care across multiple contexts.

1.     Analyze existing research and knowledge sources to determine its relevance and applicability to diverse groups.

2.     Amalgamate best evidence and patient perspectives in planning care.

3.     Facilitate access to data resources and services for the provision of culturally competent care.

4.     Contribute in the collection, documentation, and use of cultural and social data in the planning, delivery, and evaluation of care.

5.     Advocate for the protection of vulnerable populations in human subject research.

 

II. Use relevant data sources and best evidence in providing culturally competent care.

1.     Advocate for effective resources to facilitate cross-cultural communication for patients with limited English proficiency and health literacy.

2.     Join in providing leadership to interprofessional teams to minimize and prevent health disparities and to achieve culturally competent programs and services.

3.     Understand quality and patient safety as complex system issues that involve patients and members of the healthcare team.

4.     Collaborate with patients and families to identify mutually agreed upon goals and outcomes of care.

 

III. Promote achievement of safe and quality outcomes of care for diverse populations.

1.     Identify the historic and contemporary implications of public policies and discrimination influencing health, healthcare systems, and use of healthcare services by racial, ethnic, and other vulnerable groups.

2.     Recognize and report individual and institutional discrimination practices, unequal treatment practices, breaches of patients’ human and civil rights, or violations of respect for patient autonomy to appropriate authorities.

3.     Exhibit leadership in addressing behavior that is insensitive, lacks cultural understanding, or reflects prejudice in order to improve adherence to professional standards or respect and civility.

4.     Display cultural competence in ethical decisions about care delivery.

 

IV. Advocate for social justice, including commitment to the health of vulnerable populations and the elimination of health disparities.

1.     Participate actively in continual self-reflection of own behaviors toward diverse patients and other members of the interprofessional team.

2.     Articulate the value of pursuing lifelong learning about different cultures to cultivate professional growth and development and deliver culturally competent health care.

3.     Engage in a variety of activities to acquire understanding of cultural differences and similarities about health and healthcare to enhance ability to work with diverse and vulnerable populations.

 

V. Participates in continuous cultural competence development.

 


  E&H College and School of Health Sciences Policies

  Equal Opportunity Policy

Emory & Henry College admits eligible students regardless of age, disability, ethnicity, gender, race, religion, sexual orientation, or social class.  Each student is given all the rights and privileges to all programs and activities bestowed or made available to students at the college. Emory & Henry College does not discriminate on the basis of age, disability, ethnicity, gender, race, religion, sexual orientation, or social class in admission, employment, activities, programs or services.

  Disability Services

Students who experience some difficulties in their educational pursuits are expected to present documentation or have testing to receive services.  Please review the link below.

https://www.ehc.edu/powell-resource-center/disability-support-services/

  Preregistration and Registration For Courses

All fees must be paid if the student is to maintain eligibility for preregistration and registration for courses. Please refer to the section on Fees for specific requirements as stated in the Academic Catalog.

Each semester, students preregister for the courses to be taken in the following semester. All preregistration information is submitted to the Registrar through online registration with the approval of the faculty advisor. More information regarding online registration is available in the Centralized Student Assistance Office and on the Registrar’s website.

Preregistered courses become registered courses on registration day. Registration day is the first day of a semester, and all students are required to have completed their initial schedule and be registered by that date. No student may register later than the last day for course addition designated in the academic calendar. Students who do not complete registration (including payment of fees) by the end of the last day for course addition will be removed from the college roster, will not be permitted to attend classes, and will not be allowed to register retroactively.

  Change of Schedule After Registration Day

For any change of schedule after registration day, including dropping or adding one or more courses, a student must use the forms available in the Centralized Student Assistance Office. Changes are permitted only during the period specified in the college calendar and must be accompanied by the written consent of the faculty advisor and the Registrar or the Provost. Students may add a course after the first scheduled class session only with the written permission of the instructor.

  Grades And Grade Points

Emory & Henry uses the 4.0grade point system. In this system, the grade point average (GPA) is determined by using a system of grade points per letter grade, as shown below, weighted according to the semester hours of credit earned in each course. For example, a student who earns an A in a course which has three semester hours credit will get twelve grade points (4 points x 3 hours) for that course, whereas a B earned in a course which has two semester hours credit will get six grade points (3 points x 2 hours). The total of grade points earned each term is divided by the total semester hours attempted, to yield the student’s overall GPA. The overall GPA and the letter grade for each completed course are issued to the student at the end of each semester.

Letter Grade                                                             Grade Points per Semester Hour

A+                                                                                        4.00

A                                                                                          4.00

A-                                                                                         3.67

B+                                                                                        3.33

B                                                                                          3.00

B-                                                                                         2.67

C+                                                                                        2.33

C                                                                                          2.00

C-                                                                                         1.67

D+                                                                                        1.33

D                                                                                          1.00

D-                                                                                         0.67

F                                                                                           0 (Failure)

W (Withdrawn)                                                                    No credit/no penalty

WF (Withdrawn Failing)                                                     0 (Failure)

WP (Withdrawn Passing)                                                    No credit/no penalty

P (Passing)                                                                           Credit given but no grade points

NG (No Grade)                                                                    No credit/no penalty

I (Incomplete)                                                                      No credit/no penalty*

IP (In Progress)                                                                    No credit/no penalty*

*See Incomplete and In Progress Courses below

  Change of Grade

An instructor may submit a change of grade only in cases where the final grade has been miscalculated. A change of grade cannot be based on the submission of additional coursework.

  Repeating a Course to Improve the Grade

Regardless of the grade earned, a student may retake any regularly scheduled course except an independent study or an internship. In consultation with the advisor, a student may substitute a Great Works in Context, Connections, Religion Requirement course (111, 131, 132, or 200) or Statistics course (161, 162, or 163) with a different number. In the case of such courses, the student wishing to take the new course on a substitution basis must inform the Registrar of this by completing a Repeated Course Form before the last day for course addition designated in the academic calendar for the semester. (Otherwise, the second Great Works in Context, Connections, Religion Requirement, or Statistics course will be treated as a new and separate course enrollment.) Substitution does not apply to Modes of Inquiry courses.

When a course is repeated at Emory & Henry College, only the higher grade is used in computing the GPA. The other grade is shown on the college transcript but is designated as not applicable to the GPA. If a student is taking a repeatable course, such as GNST 151 or MUSP 230, and wishes both grades to be included, the student can indicate this on the Repeated Course Form, which is submitted to the Centralized Student Assistance Office, where the appropriate adjustments are made. Special Topics courses, numbered 150 or 350, may be repeated for credit only if there is a different course title. Other courses may not be repeated for credit unless specifically allowed in the course description. Courses repeated after graduation may not be used to raise the GPA earned prior to graduation.

  Transcript of Grades

In addition to the end-of-semester grades available to students on WebAdvisor, an official transcript is maintained for each student in the Centralized Student Assistance Office. The transcript is part of the school’s permanent records during and after the student’s period of attendance. A student or alumnus may obtain a copy of his or her transcript by sending a written request to the Registrar. Pursuant to the Privacy Act and because a signature is required, requests made by telephone cannot be honored. Student accounts must be current, and graduate accounts must be paid in full before transcripts will be released. 

  Transfer Credit

Credit for academic work completed with a grade of C (2.0) or better may be transferred if the course is appropriate to the curriculum of Emory & Henry. (Transfer credit will be awarded for transferable courses in which a grade of P was earned, provided that the course bears not more than one semester hour of credit, and that the course grading scheme was P/F by election of the college, as opposed to election of the student.) The work must be completed at a regionally accredited college or university, i.e., accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools or a comparable association. (Credits from a U.S. college or university holding accreditation through some other agency are evaluated on an individual basis.) Grades for courses taken elsewhere may not be transferred, and a student’s cumulative GPA is based solely on work attempted at Emory & Henry. The Registrar and appropriate department chairs evaluate all transfer credit and determine its applicability toward fulfillment of requirements at Emory & Henry.

For those students pursuing an undergraduate degree at Emory & Henry, a maximum of 62 semester hours may be transferred from a community college or other two-year institution and applied toward graduation at Emory & Henry. Credit for work done outside the United States, unless it is part of a study abroad program sponsored by Emory & Henry College, must be evaluated at the student’s expense by an international transcript evaluator recognized by the National Association of Credential Evaluation Services (NACES) or evaluated by the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers International Education Services.  

In order to receive credit for the equivalent of a course numbered 300 or above at Emory & Henry, a student must have completed the course at a regionally accredited institution that grants a baccalaureate degree or must receive approval of the chair of the appropriate department at Emory & Henry. Transfer of credit from four-year institutions is subject to the graduation requirement that the following must be taken at Emory & Henry: the final 33 semester hours, half of the required courses in the major, half of the minor or the contextual and support area (if one is included in the student’s major), the Great Works in Context and Connections courses. Exceptions must be approved by the Provost. Each course must have been graded C (2.0) or better in order to transfer. The college does not grant credit for non-credit courses, for life experience, or for professional certificates. Courses accepted for transfer from other institutions are not used in the computation of grade point averages for academic good standing.

Students already enrolled in Emory & Henry who wish to take coursework at other institutions must seek advance approval from the faculty advisor, the chair of the department in which the course falls, and the Provost or Registrar. Approval forms are available in the Centralized Student Assistance Office and online. Such applications, especially for courses to meet requirements, should be made only in exceptional circumstances and for convincing academic reasons. The chair of the department involved may specify that following the completion of a course at another institution, transfer of credit is contingent upon satisfactory completion of a departmental examination at Emory & Henry. The Committee on Academic Standards serves as a board of appeals for proposals which do not receive approval from any of the above academic officers.

Students are not permitted to transfer courses to Emory & Henry if those courses are taken concurrently with enrollment at the college, except with prior approval by the Provost. The college’s limits with respect to course load apply also to courses taken at other schools, or at any combination of schools.

  Transfer Students         

 (This section will need to be updated to new Core)

Transfer students are required to meet all Emory & Henry College Proficiency, Core, and Modes of Inquiry requirements outlined in the catalog above under “Core Curriculum Requirements” (subsections A, B, and C), and “Requirements for Graduation,” with the exceptions noted below:

Only transfer students who have completed at least twelve semester hours of college credit elsewhere following high school graduation may be exempted from completing Transitions I (ETLA 100).

Students who have completed at least twenty-six transferable semester hours elsewhere following high school graduation are exempted from the Lifetime Wellness course (ETLA 103), but not the associated physical activity courses.

Transfer students who enter Emory & Henry with at least fifty-six semester hours completed elsewhere following high school graduation are exempt from the Foundations (ETLA 200) and the Emory Abroad requirements.

The college’s Great Works in Context and Connections requirements must be completed.

  Online Student Privacy Policy

Student Conduct

Technological Responsibilities

As part of their online course experience, students should practice technological responsibility. Students should

  • have a back-up plan in place in case of computer difficulties or loss of internet service.
  • avoid using “technical problems” as an excuse for late work.
  • search online for solutions to error messages or other difficulties before contacting the Help Desk.
Communication and Netiquette
  • Students and faculty should communicate respectfully and professionally. Inappropriate language or behavior may result in disciplinary action and/or expulsion.
  • Writing Expectations – Students should use standard English grammar, spelling, punctuation, and capitalization.
  • Proofread all work before submitting it.
  • Avoid acronyms, emoticons, and abbreviations such as “u” for “you,” “B4” for “before,” and so on.

Student Privacy

 Identity Protection
  • All course participants will be issued a username and password. Students are prohibited from sharing this information for any reason, including allowing others to access course materials.
  • Students must fill out the online consent form available on the E&H website. This form allows students to indicate how and when the College may release personal information. (To inform faculty of Family Education Rights and Policies Act [FERPA] rights and obligations, the College will distribute the Information Release Policy and offer presentations at faculty meetings.)
  • To verify that the registered student is the same person who completes the coursework, the College will periodically check student IDs.
  • Students may also be asked to present identification in the following circumstances:
    • Campus visits
    • Face-to-face classes
    • Video conferences with instructors
Data Protection

All distance education courses are housed and conducted in Moodle, our learning management system. To ensure the security of the student database, the College uses eThink, a cloud-based security system. Backups of student accounts and work are performed daily.

Institutionally, College software administrators enroll online students using data from our student information system. Faculty track student grades through Moodle. Students may access only courses in which they are enrolled and may view only their own grades.

Participation and Attendance

Attendance Requirements

Just as in traditional classes, professors of online courses often require attendance. Individual instructor requirements will vary, but faculty are required to record students’ log-ins at least twice a week. Online students will register their attendance digitally by logging onto the course management system.

Orientation for Online Learners (OOL)

All students enrolled in online programs are required to complete Orientation for Online Learners training module. These lessons will include campus support contact information, help with technology functionality, time management, study habits, and communication skills.

Academic Integrity

Distance education students are required to sign and abide by the same academic honesty statement as traditional students. To ensure academic integrity, Emory & Henry College uses Respondus, a secure browser application, and Respondus Monitor, a tool that allows faculty to observe students via webcam. Moodle also offers additional features such as password-protected tests and random-ordered questions.

Academic Honesty

Identity Checks

To ensure that the enrolled student is the one who actually takes the course, the College has instituted the following identity checks:

  • First check: when students enroll and register
  • Second check: when students attend face-to-face sessions with faculty or attend on-campus events. (If a class does not require a face-to-face meeting, faculty will be expected to verify a student’s identity through a web conference.)
Complaint Process

If a student has a complaint, they should first try to resolve the issue by talking to the relevant faculty or staff member (who may ask for additional information and/or schedule an appointment to discuss the problem.) If the student does not feel comfortable contacting the faculty/staff member, they may address the relevant supervisor. If no resolution is possible, the student should submit a formal written, signed complaint to the Director of Human Resources/Title IX Coordinator.

The formal complaint should include

  • The actual complaint stated as specifically as possible;
  • A description of the desired outcome.

The Student Complaint form is available online at https://www.ehc.edu/files/4713/7356/1378/Complaint-Form.pdf or in the Human Resources Office. Each student has the right to seek a remedy for a disagreement. Specific policies and procedures are outlined in the Academic Catalog and the Student Handbook; possible issues include grade appeals, parking tickets appeals, student conduct, and student records.

In the case of issues not covered by the Catalog or Handbook, students have the right to file a complaint and request resolution. The dean of the relevant area (or a designee) will address the complaint in a timely manner and resolve it appropriately. If the complainant is dissatisfied with the resolution, they may appeal to the president of the College. This policy does not apply to academic grade disputes, Title IX issues, or other published policies or procedures.

If a student prefers to report a concern anonymously, they may call the independently-administered Campus Conduct Hotline at (866)-943-5786. The hotline is available twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. All calls remain confidential (and anonymous if desired). The hotline operator will submit all inquiries to the appropriate College staff member.

  Dismissal from a Course

A student who proves unable or unwilling to carry a course satisfactorily may be dropped from it by the Committee on Academic Standards upon recommendation of the instructor. When a student is dismissed from a class by the Committee on Academic Standards, the grade that is recorded on the student’s transcript will be the grade (W, WP, WF, or F) that would have been earned had the student withdrawn voluntarily at that time. If dismissal occurs after the period designated for course changes, tuition and fee adjustments will not be made.

  Withdrawal from a Class

A student may drop a class during the period specified in the academic calendar and the course will not be recorded on the transcript. A student may voluntarily withdraw with an entry of W (Withdrawn) on the transcript after the last day for course addition and continuing through the withdrawal deadline. Withdrawals after this time and prior to mid-semester are recorded on the transcript and designated by the instructor as either WP (Withdrawn Passing) or WF (Withdrawn Failing). After mid-semester all withdrawals are designated as WF (Withdrawn Failing) unless the withdrawal is for demonstrably bona fide reasons acceptable to the Committee on Academic Standards.

Students are not permitted to withdraw from a course to avoid the consequences of academic dishonesty.

All withdrawals must be submitted officially on forms available from the Registrar. The student’s withdrawal will be official on the date this form is signed by the Provost or Registrar. The dates for Withdrawal Passing are not the same as the dates for withdrawal accompanied by refund of tuition charges, as described in the catalog section on Refunds in the Event of Withdrawal from a Class.

  Withdrawal From Emory & Henry College

A student who withdraws from Emory & Henry before the close of a semester must receive clearance from the Dean of Students. Withdrawal forms are available from the Registrar. Withdrawal will be complete and refunds will be issued based on the date the form is signed by the Dean of Students, following an exit interview. Refunds will be given as described in the catalog section on Refunds in the Event of Withdrawal from the College.

A student who withdraws from the college during the period specified in the academic calendar for course addition will have no courses recorded on the transcript for the semester. Withdrawals will be recorded as W (Withdrawn) on the transcript after the last day for course addition and continuing through the withdrawal deadline. An additional time period is allotted for withdrawals to be recorded on the transcript and designated by the instructor as either WP (Withdrawn Passing) or WF (Withdrawn Failing). After the WP/WF deadline, all withdrawals are designated as WF (Withdrawn Failing) unless the withdrawal is for medical or other demonstrably bona fide reasons acceptable to the Committee on Academic Standards.

When seeking a medical withdrawal, students must submit to the Associate Provost a paper copy of their request to withdraw for medical reasons no later than seven class days prior to the last day of classes; students should consult the current academic calendar for withdrawal deadlines. To be approved, withdrawals for medical reasons must be certified by a licensed health professional via a letter on the health professional’s letterhead (sent to the Associate Provost) with sufficient explanation as to the medical justification for the student’s withdrawal. Medical withdrawals approved by Academic Standards are designated as W (Withdrawn).

The Committee on Academic Standards will also require a student receiving a medical withdrawal to provide a letter by a licensed health professional on the professional’s letterhead stating that the student is ready to return to a college environment. This should also be sent to the Associate Provost. In order for a student who has received a medical withdrawal to return for the following semester, this letter should be received by the Associate Provost two days before the start of the next semester’s classes. Any student who has been gone from the College for at least one full semester must apply for readmission in order to return. See Readmission of Students in this catalog.

  Leave of Absence

An enrolled student intending to suspend the college experience by taking a semester or longer off from classes may request a Leave of Absence in writing to the Registrar. This request must be submitted before the last day to withdraw with a grade of W of the semester in which the leave commences. The request will be reviewed by the Provost, who will normally grant it. The Leave of Absence can be for one or two semesters, subject to extension if an additional request is filed. The student may reenter the college at the end of the leave (or earlier) simply by announcing to the Registrar the intent to do so. While on leave a student may preregister for the semester in which he or she plans to return, by contacting the Registrar. A student on academic, financial, or social dismissal is not eligible for a Leave of Absence. A student who has formally withdrawn from the college cannot retroactively seek a Leave of Absence.

A student on leave is not prohibited from taking courses at another school, although transfer of any such courses back to Emory & Henry cannot be assured without prior approval; see the section above on Transfer Credit.

Financial aid for semesters in the distant future cannot be guaranteed; however, when possible, students returning from Leave of Absence will receive the same financial aid support that they would have received had they remained as continuous students. Exceptions may arise, for instance, (a) when the student’s financial status changes, (b) when governmental aid regulations change, or (c) when the student’s endowed scholarship has been awarded to another student in the interim.

  Kelly Library

Kelly Library functions as the heart of the College’s academic program. Library staff work with students and faculty ​to develop research skills, provide a wide range of support services, and enhance the teaching and learning experience. The library’s print and electronic holdings are designed to support the areas of studies offered at the College and to encourage intellectual and personal growth in a liberal arts setting.   The Frederick T. Kelly Library provides easy access to more than 300,000 items including books, ebooks, periodicals, government documents, DVDs, compact discs, and electronic databases. Kelly Library subscribes to approximately 320 periodicals and newspapers in print, and over 100,000 full-text periodicals and newspapers in electronic databases available through the Library’s website. The Library’s electronic resources can be accessed on library and computer lab workstations, on personal devices, and remotely from off-campus.  

Open 92.5 hours per week during the fall and spring semesters, the library has professional librarians available to provide individualized and group instruction in the use of the library and its resources. All exceptions to the regular schedule are posted on the door, on the library’s web page, and social media.   Students may check out print materials for 30 days and DVDs and CDs for one week. Although the library does not charge overdue fines for its materials, students are encouraged to return all materials promptly so they are available for other patrons.

All materials must be returned by the end of each semester. Failure to return Kelly Library materials in a timely manner could result in items being billed to the student’s College account. The replacement charge for each item (books, CDs, DVDs, etc.) is a minimum of $75 depending on the actual replacement cost, plus processing, of the lost item. ​Books borrowed from the other members of the Holston Associated  Libraries consortium are subject to overdue fines from that library and must be paid at the lending library.  Facilities include collaborative study space, private study carrels, networked computers and printers, Wi-Fi, photocopying machines, microfilm reader-printers, Kelly Computer Lab, the McGowan Computer Classroom, and the Robert D. and Rachel K. Denham Poetry Collection. Kelly Library is a member of the Holston Associated Libraries, with whom it shares a catalog, and offers reciprocal borrowing privileges. Kelly Library also belongs to the Virtual Library of Virginia, the Bowen Central Library of the Appalachian College Association, and other library professional organizations and consortia.

  Information Technology Services Department

 All Information Technology Services (academic and administrative computing, and the campus network) are located on the basement floor of Kelly Library.  Personnel are available to provide assistance with the computing needs of the College through the IT Help Desk.   Staff support for student-owned computers is limited to assistance with network connectivity. Students experiencing problems with their personal computers should contact a local computer vendor. You may reach the IT Help Desk at extension 6881, or ithelpdesk@ehc.edu for questions or technology support needs. Hours of operation for the IT Help Desk will be posted in the IT Help Desk area at the beginning of each semester. Information Technology Services department supports the integration of technology into the teaching and learning process through a broad range of resources over the Emory & Henry computer network. 

Access to the College network requires an account, which is automatically assigned to all registered students. This account provides access to the Internet, WebAdvisor, Moodle, printing capabilities, online library resources, and e-mail. Many instructors require that students use e-mail and/or Internet applications and resources in their coursework. Campus-wide wireless Internet access is available.

Connecting to the network requires a commitment to adhere to the College’s Security and Acceptable Use of the Campus Network and Technology Policy. Enrollment or employment at Emory & Henry College signifies agreement to abide by all rules, regulations, and policies of the College.  Please note that all policies are subject to change.  Notification of changes will be published.  This document will be reviewed and distributed regularly.  All network users must adhere to the most current published revision.  Email accounts and access to other College network resources are available to graduates for 6 months after graduation. Emory & Henry College maintains a campus-wide wireless network in order to meet the network connectivity needs of our students, faculty, staff, and campus visitors. 

Emory & Henry College uses Microsoft Office applications for desktop productivity throughout the campus. Some of the computer labs on campus have specialized software for specific courses. For the location of a specific software application on campus, please contact the IT Help Desk or ​https://www.ehc.edu/information-technology 

  Vandalism or Willful Misconduct 

Information Technology Services department will not be accountable for anyone who illegally copied software that is licensed for use only on Emory & Henry computers. Intentional destruction of computing equipment is not acceptable.  Destruction includes physically damaging or placing viruses/your own software on Emory & Henry computing equipment.  Any student intentionally abusing Emory & Henry computing equipment or software will be reported to the Dean of Students and/or criminally prosecuted.

The following policies are taken from the Emory & Henry College Student Handbook

  Campus Policy & Student Conduct

The following statement has been endorsed by the governing board of Emory & Henry College, setting the framework for the College’s expectations of students.

Emory & Henry believes that both freedom and responsibility are necessary to the life of an intellectual and Christian community.  Continued membership in the Emory & Henry student body is contingent upon responsible conduct and effective participation in the life and purposes of the institution.  Students who violate this privilege or neglect this responsibility are subject to disciplinary action, including suspension or dismissal.  Definitions of these penalties and an outline of procedures for appeal are found in the Student Conduct Code section of the Student Handbook.  Appropriate procedures are provided for hearings and review, and every student has the right of appeal.

The College rejects any interference with the legitimate rights of others, the use of threat or violence, the destruction of property, and the disruption of the normal order of the College.  Lying, stealing, cheating, and plagiarism violate the College’s principles.  All forms of gambling and hazing are prohibited.  Secret fraternities or other organizations not chartered and approved by the student government are forbidden, and members are subject to disciplinary action.

The College recognizes the right of students to dissent and disagree with the faculty, the administration, and the governors.  Free exchange of ideas is encouraged, and channels of communication are provided.  Dissent and disagreement must be exercised in an orderly fashion which does not infringe on the rights of others, jeopardize public order or safety, or disrupt the normal order of the College.  Student conduct which violates these standards will lead to disciplinary action which may include suspension or dismissal.  Other persons who violate these standards are subject to legal action.

Since its establishment in 1836 as a Methodist-related institution of higher education, Emory & Henry College has sought to be a learning community that moves toward fulfilling every student’s potential.  In order to provide the best possible environment for learning and enrichment, not only among our students, but among members of the community who gather here for special events, we strongly encourage students, young adults, and guests to the College to make mature and respectful decisions in their lives particularly with respect to the illegal use and/or irresponsible consumption of alcohol and drugs.

While Emory & Henry College encourages abstinence from the use of alcohol in accordance with longstanding Methodist tradition due to societal problems that result from its misuse and abuse, we recognize the right of students 21-years of age or older to consume alcoholic beverages in accordance with state law.  The College supports responsible drinking for those of legal age who wish to consume alcohol while balancing that right against the need to provide a safe and welcoming campus environment free from abusive and disruptive behavior that often accompanies excessive drinking or intoxication.  Accordingly, the College will follow state law prohibitions on campus with respect to (1) public intoxication; (2) public display or public consumption of alcohol outside of residence hall rooms, except at special events approved by the Dean of Students, and then only in designated areas.  Binge drinking is strongly discouraged.  Evidence suggests a strong link between the consumption of alcohol and incidents of sexual assault or abuse, so students should always be careful when consuming alcoholic beverages, especially when consumed along with prescription medications.  The use of illegal drugs is prohibited on campus in accordance with state law.  Students who violate policy or state law are subject to disciplinary action and/or arrest and guest who violate policy or state law are subject to removal from campus and/or arrest.

Emory & Henry College defines a student as an individual who has made a deposit to attend or is currently enrolled in at least one course.  Individuals who have graduated or withdrawn from the College are no longer considered students.  Violations of policies and procedures, while a student, will be resolved through the listed policies and procedures.

  Academic Policies

The Emory & Henry Academic Catalog contains the College’s official statement of academic policies and programs.  The Code of Conduct and Honor Code, as printed in this Student Handbook, define the College’s expectations for academic integrity, as well as outline procedures to be followed in instances of academic misconduct.  Students are expected to inform themselves regarding these policies and procedures and to fulfill all academic requirements.  Questions regarding academic policies may be directed to the student’s academic advisor, the Dean of Faculty, the Registrar, or the Student Government.

  Student Records:  Confidentiality and Access

Enrollment at the College constitutes student permission to distribute information to advisors and college offices when needed for academic advisement, for verification of academic standing, and for eligibility for honors, awards, scholarships, and for participation in sports and activities.  Emory & Henry provides for the confidentiality of student education records in accordance with the General Education Provisions Act, Title IV, Public Law 90 – 247 (or as amended) and under the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act.

The law provides for interchange of student records between faculty members and administrators within Emory & Henry as necessitated by the educational program, but it prohibits the College from releasing the records to persons outside the College, unless consent is first obtained from the student or is court-ordered.

Records are classified into two main categories:  directory and educational.  Directory records contain only general information; included in this category are any lists which may have a student’s name, address, phone number, date and place of birth, field of study, dates of attendance, and height/weight, if an athlete.  This information is circulated freely within the College.  It is not made readily available to off-campus persons or group for purposes of solicitation.  If a student wants to have their directory information withheld from publication, it is the student’s responsibility to notify the Dean of Students Office.

It is the student’s responsibility to notify the Dean of Students Office of any change or error in name, address, social security number, or factors relevant to status.  One opportunity to do this is at fall opening when returning students are sent by email a personal information update but changes within the year must be reported immediately to the Dean of Students Office.

Educational records include transcripts, evaluation forms, such as student teaching reports, letters of reference, and correspondence on student conduct matters.  These records are shared among the College faculty and staff only for bona fide reasons related to the educational program.  In regard to third-party access, the student controls the release of these records, usually through written permission to the office which maintains the records of particular interest.  Each student controls access to their own records and can grant access to specific individuals, typically parents, via the Disclosure form found on the Forms Directory or in the Centralized Student Assistance Office.  Students should be aware that the Code of Virginia (23-9.2:15, approved April 30, 2015) requires schools to include a prominent notation on the academic transcript of each student who has been suspended for, has been permanently dismissed from, or withdraws from the institution while under investigation for an offense involving sexual violence under the institution’s code of conduct.  The College is required under this law to have a procedure for removing such a notation from the academic transcript of any student who is subsequently found not to have committed an offense involving sexual violence based upon the College’s Code of Conduct.  As a general policy, non-transcript records are maintained for 5 years.

Academic Records are released regularly to each student’s faculty advisor who helps the student interpret the education program and meet its requirements, interpret the course schedule and register for each semester, and deal with academic problems as they arise.  It is the student’s responsibility to meet all academic requirements.  The following is a list of offices which maintain the educational records:

  • Academic records and transcripts – Registrar
  • Academic progress reports – Faculty advisors and Registrar
  • Correspondence on student conduct proceedings – Dean of Students
  • Placement folders (must be compiled by student) – Director of Career Services
  • Financial aid records – Director of Student Financial Planning
  • General financial records (including student accounts) – Vice President for Business and Finance
  • Parking/on-campus traffic files – Campus Police/Security

The College shares students’ personally identifiable information for relevant reasons with the following:  American College Testing Program; Balfour; Cappex.com LLC; College Bound Selection Service; Chegg; College Board; College Sports Project; Colleges That Change Lives, Inc.; Corcoran Communications; Council for Aid to Education; Council of Independent Colleges of Virginia; Educational Testing Service, Inc.; Hobsons; iData; National Research Center for College and University Admissions; National Survey of Student Engagement; Noel-Levitz; The Outcomes Survey; and The Parish Group.

As of January 3, 2012, the U.S. Department of Education’s FERPA regulations expand the circumstances under which education records and personally identifiable information (PII) contained in such records – including Social Security Number, grades, or other private information – may be accessed without consent.  First, the U.S. Comptroller General, the U.S. Attorney General, the U.S. Secretary of Education, or state and local education authorities (“Federal and State Authorities”) may allow access to student records and PII without student consent to any third party designated by a Federal or State Authority to evaluate a federal- or state-supported education program.  The evaluation may relate to any program that is “principally engaged in the provision of education,” such as early childhood education and job training, as well as any program that is administered by an education agency or institution.  Second, Federal and State Authorities may allow access to education records and PII without student consent to researchers performing certain types of studies, in certain cases even when we object to or do not request such research  Federal and State Authorities must obtain certain use-restriction and data security promises from the entities that they authorize to receive PII, but the authorities need not maintain direct control over such entities.  In addition, in connection with Statewide Longitudinal Data Systems, State Authorities may collect, compile, permanently retain, and share without student consent PII from education records, and they may track student participation in education and other programs by linking such PII to other personal information about the student that they obtain from other Federal or State data sources, including workforce development, unemployment insurance, child welfare, juvenile justice, military service, and migrant student records systems.

  General Policies

Please review the following policies found in the Student Handbook at https://www.ehc.edu/live/files/348-508-student-handbook-2018-19 as well as the below policies.

  • Academic Integrity Code                    Page 75
  • Non-Academic Conduct Code            Page 78
  • Emory & Henry Honor Code               Page 87

College Identification Cards

Every student upon registration, receives their College identification card.  The E&H ID card serves many purposes.  It can be used as your College identification; it can be used as a debit card on campus if you deposit funds into your student account; and, if you live in a building that has card access, it serves as your entrance card.  It is required to borrow materials from the library and serves as an admission ticket to all intercollegiate athletic events, cultural programs, and other specified College-sponsored activities.  Boarding students must present the ID card for admission to the cafeteria serving area.  The ID card is required for cashing checks in the Centralized Student Assistance Office.  Intentional misrepresentation or misuse of the ID card is considered a violation of College policy.  Failure to present the ID card when requested by a campus security office or other College official is a violation of College regulations.  The replacement cost of an ID is $50.00; replacement cards are available in the Campus Police/Security Office, located in Martin-Brock on the first floor.

Payments

The student account statement for each semester will be based on the pre-registered courses selected, the particular meal plan chosen, the particular dorm room assigned, and other miscellaneous items, such as having an automobile on campus and student insurance. All billing statements must be viewed online. Students (and others, if permission is granted by the student) may view their student account online at any time utilizing their assigned ID and password. All students are responsible for maintaining their student account online to ensure that the accounts stay up-to-date at all times/

Payment for the fall term is due in full by August 1, 2019 and payment for the spring term is due in full by January 1, 2020. By these dates, payment in full is required (payments may be made online through Student Portal or by mail) or enrollment in the Tuition Management Systems payment plan is required to cover the amount due (there are options for 8, 10 or 12 payments, depending on date of enrollment).  

Emory & Henry College will drop classes if payment arrangements are not completed satisfactorily by August 1, 2018 and January 1, 2019, respectively. If enrollment in the payment plan is completed and payments are returned for any reason, and the amount due is not paid within 30 days of the due date, classes will be dropped, enrollment in the payment plan will be terminated, and any remaining balance due on the student account will be due in full to Emory & Henry College immediately.  

The account statement may change if changes are made to class registration, the meal plan, the dorm, or other miscellaneous items.  

Any student whose account is not current will be ineligible to participate in preregistration or room draw. Any student whose account is not fully settled by the conclusion of a semester will be ineligible to obtain (or maintain, if preregistered) a class schedule for the subsequent semester. A transcript and/or diploma will not be issued to any student whose account is not settled. Also, any senior student whose account is not settled may be prohibited from participating in commencement activities. Should a period of 90 days pass without any activity on an account with an unpaid balance, then the college may refer the account to a collection agency. The student will be responsible for the fees of any collection agency, which may be based on a percentage at a maximum of 33.333% of the debt, and all costs and expenses, including reasonable attorney’s fees, the college incurs in such collection efforts. A delinquent account may be reported to major credit bureaus for nonpayment. Failure to comply with the payment obligation will result in the application of a FINANCE CHARGE to the unpaid account balance. The FINANCE CHARGE will be applied at the monthly periodic rate of 1% (ANNUAL PERCENTAGE RATE OF 12%).  

Refunds in the Event of Withdrawal from the College

The college operates on an annual budget that necessitates advance planning and financial commitments to teaching staff and others whose services are essential to its operation. For this reason, no semester charges are removed for those persons who are dismissed from the college for disciplinary reasons. Likewise, students who withdraw from the college, even for illness or other emergencies, receive no refunds of room rent or other fees. Adjustments for tuition and board are pro-rated as indicated below. The date of withdrawal used to compute a student’s balance is the date on which the Dean of Students signs the official college withdrawal form.

The student who leaves school at one date and waits to withdraw officially at a later date receives appropriate adjustments based on the date of official withdrawal. For an explanation of the procedures for official withdrawal, consult the catalog section on ​Academic Policies​.

Student Account Adjustments for College Withdrawals During the Regular Academic Year

Before the first class                                                    100% (less advance deposits)

Before end of first week of class                                 90% adjustment to tuition and meals

Before end of second week of class                            75% adjustment to tuition and meals 

Before end of third week of class                               50% adjustment to tuition and meals

Before end of fourth week of class                             25% adjustment to tuition and meals

No adjustments are made to tuition or meals after the fourth week of class.  

During Summer Session

During first week of session                                       75% adjustment to tuition

No adjustment to tuition after first week of summer session   

Financial Aid Adjustments

Federal regulations require financial aid funds to be awarded under the assumption that a student will attend the institution for the entire period in which federal assistance was awarded. When a student withdraws from all courses for any reason, including medical withdrawals, he/she may no longer be eligible for the full amount of funds that he/she was originally scheduled to receive. The return of federal funds is based upon the premise that students earn their financial aid in proportion to the amount of time in which they are enrolled. A prorated schedule is used to determine the amount of federal student aid funds he/she will have earned at the time of the withdrawal. Thus, a student who withdraws in the second week of class has earned less of his/her financial aid than a student who withdraws in the seventh week. Once 60 percent of the semester is completed, a student is considered to have earned all of his/her financial aid and will not be required to return any funds to the federal government. Federal law requires schools to calculate how much federal financial aid a student has earned if that student completely withdraws OR stops attending before completing the semester. Therefore, return of federal funds may result in a balance due to the college. In such case, the entire balance is due to the college immediately.  

Refunds in the Event of Withdrawal from a Class

The schedule of refunds for withdrawal from a class is different from the above. No adjustments are granted for a course dropped later than seven​ calendar​ days after registration day. For full details on the procedures to be completed for official withdrawals, see the catalog section on ​Academic Policies​. Note that the timetable for withdrawal from class without academic penalty is different from the timetable for withdrawal accompanied by refund.  

Refunds of Excess Financial Aid

Students receiving financial aid funds, including student and/or parent loans, are entitled to a refund of any excess funds remaining after all current charges, in accordance with federal regulations, have been paid in full. Please note that financial aid may be subject to change before refund calculation if a student is not enrolled full time at the end of the registration drop/add period. Refunds will not be made from any funds that have not been credited to the student’s account in the Centralized Student Assistance Office. A refund will automatically be issued for an account with a credit balance unless the student (or parent for a PLUS loan) signs an Account Authorization Form which authorizes the college to hold the funds in excess of current charges on the student’s account, or refund only the credit balance after bookstore and other authorized charges are deducted. Any student whose refund is the result of a parent PLUS Loan must have that parent authorize in writing if the refund goes to the student rather than to the parent(s). Refunds will be generated within fourteen days after financial aid is transferred to the student’s account.

Perkins Loans Exit Interviews

Students receiving Perkins Loans while at Emory & Henry must complete an exit interview at mycampusloan.com upon leaving the college, in accordance with federal regulations. All students will be notified by email with appropriate information regarding the interview process. All students who fail to complete the interview will be ineligible to receive transcripts and/or diplomas.

Smoking on Campus 

The smoking policy on the main campus located in Emory restricts smoking to certain areas for the purpose of health and fire safety.  There is to be no smoking in any campus building or outside of campus buildings except in designated smoking areas located at least 25 feet from all entries, outdoor air intakes, and operable windows. This includes tobacco products and electronic smoking devices. Everyone is asked to please use the containers that are provided outside of buildings for the disposal of cigarette butts.

The School of Health Sciences, located in Marion, is a tobacco-free campus. This policy supports a healthy environment for all members of our college community. This means that all types of tobacco products are prohibited in all college buildings and on all college-owned properties, including parking lots and all outside areas. This policy is intended to encourage improved health by eliminating the use of tobacco products given the mission of this campus. It is not intended to send tobacco use from our campus to neighboring areas.

  Student Complaint Policy

 If a student has a complaint, it is recommended that they first contact the office directly involved regarding the issue and seek resolution. The staff or faculty member may ask for additional information and may schedule an appointment to address the concern.  If the student does not feel comfortable directly contacting the staff or faculty member connected to the complaint, the student can speak with the supervisor of that area. 

If a resolution with the office is not possible, the student should submit a formal written and signed complaint to the Director of Human Resources and Title IX Coordinator.

The formal complaint should include: 

  • The actual complaint stated as specifically as possible, and
  • The desired outcome.

The Student Complaint Form can be found in the Human Resources Office.

Each student has the right to seek a remedy to a dispute or disagreement. Specific policies and procedures are outlined in the Academic Catalog and in the Student Handbook pertaining to appeals for grades, parking tickets, student conduct cases, and student records. In these cases, published policies and procedures are applied. In issues that are not covered by these policies and procedures, students have a right to file a complaint and request resolution. 

The Dean of the area of concern or their designee will be assigned to address the complaint in a timely manner and to the best of their ability. Appropriate actions will be taken to resolve the issue for the student and to improve services in the future.  If the problem is not resolved, the complainant may request a meeting with the President of the College.​  This policy does not apply to academic grade disputes, Title IX issues, or other published policies and procedures. 

In the event that a student has a concern that they would like to express anonymously, the College participates in a service called the Campus Conduct Hotline at (866) 943-5787. The Campus Conduct Hotline system is available for use around the clock, seven days a week. Because the Hotline is operated by an independent organization, any calls made through this Hotline are completely confidential.  The Hotline operator will record the complaint or concern and forward it to the appropriate staff member at the College for review and action as appropriate. Callers to the Hotline may remain anonymous. 

  Discrimination and Social Harassment Policy 

In compliance with Title VI and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Americans with Disabilities Act and other federal, state, and local equal opportunity laws, and in accordance with our values. ​Emory & Henry College does not discriminate or permit discrimination by any member of its community, to include faculty, staff, students, visitors, vendors, contractors or third parties, against any individual on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, age, disability, veteran status, or genetic information in matters of employment, admissions, housing, services, or its educational programs and activities. Emory & Henry College affirms the dignity and worth of every individual.

Definitions:

  1. 1. Discrimination ​is an act or communication that alters an individual’s or group’s ability to completely participate in Emory & Henry’s community on the basis of race, sex, disability, religion, sexual orientation, national origin, or gender expression.
  2. Social Harassment ​is conduct and/or verbal action which, because of its severity, interferes with an individual’s or group’s work or education, or adversely affects living conditions.
  3. Hostile Environment ​is caused by behavior that is sufficiently serious that it interferes with or limits a student’s ability to participate in or benefit from the services, activities, or opportunities offered by the College. It is considered to be disruptive to the educational community.
  4. Mediation ​is a facilitated discussion that is conducted with the assistance of a trained third party. It is designed to help the parties to reach a mutually agreeable resolution of a dispute and may be appropriate when:
  5. The parties wish to continue communicating or working together.
  6. The complaining party is able to articulate a desired outcome.
  7. No one has been physically harmed.

Restorative Justice Resolution

 Once a formal complaint is filed with the Dean of Students or the Director of Human Resources, parties involved can request a restorative justice resolution process. The restorative justice resolution process often provides an effective means of communicating about the effects of behavior and can lead to resolving most disputes. The complainant, respondent, or a college official must agree to the restorative justice process. Parties involved may terminate the resolution process at any time and initiate the student conduct process.  (Please note that based on the nature of the complaint or if a pattern of this behavior is documented, social justice resolution may not be an option.)

  1. Discussion with Respondent: The complainant and respondent can elect to discuss the concerns directly with the other party involved, before any actions of other parties or College officials. The respondent may not understand that their conduct is offensive and unwelcome. Many arguments can be resolved or handled quickly with this form of communication. A  complaint brought to the attention of the respondent shortly after the allegedly offensive behavior occurs can usually result in effective resolution. If an effective resolution is not obtained by the discussion, then the complainant or respondent has the option to discuss the alleged offensive behavior with a college official or a mediator. 
  2. Discussion with College Officials or Mediators: A complainant or respondent can speak with or discuss concerns with a friend, confidant, advisor, or counselor. In order to initiate a social justice resolution with college officials or mediators, a complainant should contact a college official or a Student Life staff member in a timely manner. (College officials include the President of the College, Dean of Students, and Dean of Faculty.) If the complainant, respondent, or the college official involved in the restorative justice resolution feels that this option will not bring an effective resolution, they can terminate the resolution process and initiate the formal student conduct process.
  3. The Restorative Justice Discussion can help with any or all of the following:
  4. Helping the complainant and respondent decide whether the behavior violates the policy and/or to educate students more about the policy itself.
  5. Meeting with the respondent whose behavior is alleged to be offensive or unwelcome and help them understand or make it clear that the alleged behavior is unwelcome and should stop immediately.
  6. Organizing an investigation with the hope and goal of ending the alleged behavior in an expeditious manner.
  7. The resolution process will last as long as the complainant and respondent deem it desirable to continue to meet with the college official or mediator(s) designated above. Most complaints can be handled within a timely manner.
  8. What is Restorative Justice?

Restorative Justice is a collaborative decision-making process that includes harmed parties, offenders, and others who are seeking to hold offenders accountable by having them (a) accept and acknowledge responsibility for their offenses (b) to the best of their ability, repair the harm they caused to harmed parties and the community, and work to rebuild trust by showing understanding the harm, addressing personal issues, and building positive social connections. 

The resolution process will last as long as the complainant and respondent deem it desirable to continue to meet with the college official or mediator(s) designated above. Most complaints can be handled within a timely manner.  Documents regarding the resolution of the Restorative Justice process will be kept in the Dean of Students Office.

Student Conduct

College Governance 

 It is the responsibility of the Emory & Henry Board of Trustees to establish standards of conduct and regulations for the use of facilities which further the educational purpose of the College, guarantee the health and safety of the community, protect its property, and preserve its good name among its several constituencies.  The Trustees do so in the conviction that individual student actions determine or affect the general reputation of all students and public attitudes toward them and the College.  The credibility of an Emory & Henry diploma rests not only on the academic reputation of the College, but also on the quality of the total life of the College community.  The authority and responsibility for measures to implement acceptable standards for student conduct and procedures of ensuring compliance with the accompanying regulations rest directly with the President and other officers of the College specifically designated by the President to fulfill these responsibilities. 

This statement of College expectations for students is not an all-inclusive document, and the ultimate authority for the statements herein is to be found in the traditions of the College and in various official actions and policy statements of the Board of Trustees, the administration, and the faculty, acting either collectively or through their various committees. 

Emory & Henry College defines a student as an individual who has made a deposit to attend or is currently enrolled in at least one course. Individuals who have graduated or withdrawn from the College are no longer considered students. Violations of policies and procedures, while a student, will be resolved through the listed policies and procedures. 

Conduct Expectations

General Guidelines

 Emory & Henry believes that both freedom to pursue one’s goals and responsibility for one’s actions are necessary to the life of an intellectual and Christian community. As a college of liberal arts committed to the Christian faith, Emory & Henry seeks to liberate men and women socially, mentally, and spiritually. Emory & Henry College believes that its purpose is promoted or hindered by the quality of the life of the educational community. The promotion of an appropriate quality of life is the reason for the development of these expectations.

Specific rules exist for the purpose of protecting the academic and personal well-being as well as the rights and property of members of the College community.  Students who violate their privileges or neglect their responsibilities as members of the College community are subject to disciplinary action, including suspension or dismissal. Appropriate procedures are provided for hearings and review, and every student has the right to appeal. During the investigative stage and sanctioning, the Dean of Students or her/his designee, may restrict a student’s access to facilities, services, or individuals. 

The College recognizes the right of students to dissent and disagree with the faculty, the administration, and the trustees.  Free exchange of ideas is encouraged and channels of communication are provided. Dissent and disagreement should be exercised in an orderly and respectful fashion which does not infringe on the rights of others, jeopardize public order or safety, or disrupt the normal order of the College. 

Jurisdiction of the College sanctions will include 1) all areas on campus and 2) off campus when a police or campus security report or complaint or information concerning the incident is obtained by or furnished to the College. Photos displaying illegal activity (as defined by local, state, and federal law and/or the College policy) can result in campus conduct action. 

The College rejects as acceptable conduct the interference with the legitimate rights of others, the use of threat or violence, the destruction of property, and the disruption of the normal order of the College. Lying, stealing, cheating, and plagiarism violate the general principles of the College, as well as the Emory & Henry Honor Code. 

Application of Conduct Expectations

Citizenship​

College students are citizens of the state, local, and national governments, and are, therefore, expected to conduct themselves as law abiding members of the community at all times. If a student’s violation of local, state, or federal laws or ordinances also adversely affects the College’s pursuit of its educational objectives, the College may enforce its own regulations, regardless of any proceedings instituted by other authorities. 

Social Networking Websites​

Social networking websites (Twitter™, Facebook™, e.g.) are easily accessible to all students. When choosing to post information on these sites, students should be aware of three major concerns:  1) the threat of criminal activity; 2) how potential employers may view material posted; and 3) the possible violation of the College Code of Conduct.  Information posted on these sites can be used to gain access to your personal information and, in some cases, it can be used for identity theft. Please use caution when posting this information online. Do not share private information such as names, addresses, birth dates, and phone numbers with strangers. 

In addition, employers are aware of social networking sites and can use them to research candidates prior to hiring them.  Students should consider the messages they are sending when posting information to these sites.  As a policy, the College does not monitor social networking websites. However, the College does investigate incidents that are reported and investigations can include reviewing social networking activity. As a reminder, this information can be used to substantiate the violation of the Code of Conduct.  

Referral

Any student, faculty member, administrative officer, or employee of the College may charge a student with a violation of the Code of Conduct. These charges are made to the Dean of Students. The Dean may require the charge to be signed. If the dean determines that further action is warranted, formal student conduct proceedings may be invoked under provisions of the Code of Conduct and College policy.

Minor offenses​

 Any infraction of College regulations as specified in this Code of Conduct may be referred to the appropriate administrator, committee, or board for a hearing. However, the administrator dealing with a particular infraction may deem it to be a minor offense and may opt to utilize advising, counseling, and/or admonition to confront the student(s).  Such an approach is in keeping with the College’s educational mission and serves to inform and place students on notice. Information on the offense and subsequent administrative action will be recorded and maintained as an official record for the College and the student.

  Discrimination and Harassment Policy 

Policy Statements

NON-DISCRIMINATION POLICY STATEMENT

Emory & Henry College is committed to having an inclusive campus community where all members are treated with dignity and respect.  Emory & Henry College does not discriminate or permit discrimination by any member of its community, to include faculty, staff, students, visitors, vendors, contractors or third parties, against any individual on the basis of race, ethnicity, color, religion, national origin, birthplace or ancestry, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, age, marital status, national origin, language, political belief or affiliation, socioeconomic status, disability, geographic status, pregnancy or childbirth, veteran status or genetic information in matters of employment, admissions, housing, services or its educational programs and activities or status as a victim of domestic violence.  Emory & Henry College affirms the dignity and worth of every individual.

NON-HARASSMENT POLICY STATEMENT

Emory & Henry College is committed to having an inclusive campus community where all members are treated with dignity and respect.  Harassment, whether verbal, physical, electronic, or visual, that is based on any of the aforementioned characteristics in the non-discrimination policy, is a form of discrimination and will not be tolerated.  This includes harassing conduct affecting tangible job benefits, interfering unreasonably with an individual’s academic or work performance, or creating what a reasonable person would perceive as an intimidating, hostile, or offensive environment.  Prohibited sex discrimination includes sexual harassment and sexual violence.

Emory & Henry College affirms its commitment to ensuring fair and respectful learning and working conditions for its students, faculty, and professional staff. Harassment of or by faculty, professional staff, or students is unacceptable in a college because it is a form of unprofessional behavior detrimental to the educational and work environments. Emory & Henry College does not discriminate on the basis of sex in its educational programs and activities. To that end, this policy prohibits specific forms of behavior that violate Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (“Title IX”); Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (“Title VII”); and/or the Virginia Human Rights Act. Such behavior also requires the College certain obligations under the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (“VAWA”) and the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (“Clery Act”).

Definitions:

Discrimination​ is an act or communication that alters an individual’s or group’s ability to completely participate in Emory & Henry’s community on the basis of race, gender, disability, religion, sexual orientation, national origin or gender expression.

Social Harassment ​is conduct and/or verbal action which, because of its severity, interferes with an individual’s or group’s work or education, or adversely affects living conditions. Sexual harassment ​is unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature and can include unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal, nonverbal, or physical conduct of a sexual nature, such as sexual assault or acts of sexual violence.  ​(Please refer to the Policy on Sexual and Gender-based Harassment and Discrimination and Other Forms of Interpersonal Violence section of this handbook located on pages 56-73 for resolution guidelines.)

Hostile Environment ​is caused by behavior that is sufficiently serious that it interferes with or limits a student’s ability to participate in or benefit from the services, activities, or opportunities offered by the College. It is considered to be disruptive to the educational community. Determining whether or not a hostile environment exists is examined from both subjective and objective perspectives and often depends on a balancing of factors in this six-factor balancing test: -the type of harassment (e.g., whether it was verbal or physical); -the frequency and severity of the conduct; -the age, sex, and relationship of the individuals involved (e.g., teacher- student or student-student); -the setting and context in which the harassment occurred; -whether other incidents have occurred at the college or university; and other relevant factors. Mediation​is a facilitated discussion that is conducted with the assistance of a trained third party.  It is designed to help the parties to reach a mutually agreeable resolution of a dispute and may be appropriate when:

  • The parties wish to continue communicating or working together.
  • The complaining party is able to articulate a desired outcome.
  • No one has been physically harmed.

Complainant and Respondent Designations​:​ (Standard terms from the Department of Education)

Complainant​: individual who brings forward the complaint about an alleged violation of the policy.

Respondent​: individual who is the alleged perpetrator as identified by the complainant.  ​

Accommodations

An individual may request reasonable accommodations or assistance during these procedures at any time.  ​Accommodations include: a language interpreter, verbal, visual, or technology aids, adjusted class schedules and/or living arrangements, or behavior management support. (This is a non-exhaustive list. All requests for accommodations will be considered.)  

Timing and Deadlines

“Days” in these procedures refer to business days, not weekends or college holidays. Any requirement in these procedures must be completed by 3:00 PM on the day specified, unless otherwise noted.

Persons Covered by this Policy

This policy applies broadly to the entire Emory & Henry College community, including students in the School of Health Sciences; those employed by the college, including faculty, affiliates, and visiting faculty, and all staff (including all exempt and non-exempt and senior administrative positions), as well as individuals who are not employed by Emory & Henry including contractors, vendors, or other third parties contractually obligated to Emory & Henry; and visitors or guests of Emory & Henry College.

Seeking Procedural Information and Guidance on a Discrimination & Harassment Complaint Process

An individual can seek assistance and guidance from the following people:

  • Dean of Students
  • Director of Human Resources
  • Director of Inclusion & Diversity
  • Equity Officer

These persons are trained to assist the individual in assessing the incident and/or to explain the options and resources available.   Questions are encouraged; merely discussing an incident in this way does not commit an individual to making a formal complaint.  The complainant may request to have their name kept confidential at this informal stage. If there is a resolution acceptable to parties involved, the matter will not proceed further. Records will be kept of materials generated by such informal mediation along with an informal written agreement which will be reviewed and signed by parties involved, and kept in the Office of Human Resources. All cases will be reported to and tracked by the Compliance and Training Coordinator.

Making a Report And/Or Filing a Complaint

An individual can report an incident (including a bystander report of an incident), report a barrier, and/or file a complaint with the Director of Human Resources or the Compliance and Training Coordinator in the Office of Human Resources and will have the option to engage in the Restorative Justice Resolution process or a Formal Complaint process. Once the Compliance and Training Coordinator has been notified of a report and/or complaint they will acknowledge the receipt of the report and/or complaint and provide an initial response within 3-5 business days.

Emory & Henry College provides Covered Persons, whether as complainants or respondents, with support and guidance throughout the initiation, investigation, and resolution of a complaint.  For general information on resources pertaining to alleged discrimination and/or harassment violations, individuals should contact the Compliance and Training Coordinator at 276-944-6528 or email rbowyer@ehc.edu.  Emory & Henry recognizes that deciding whether to make a report or file a complaint is a personal decision, and the complainant’s autonomy is to be respected to the extent possible. However, when there is a risk of imminent harm to an individual or others, or if there is a threat to the safety of the campus, the college may be required to take immediate action upon receipt of a report and/or complaint. In such circumstances, the safety of the community is a priority and the college will provide information regarding their actions according to what the law and policy allow.  

The Office of Institutional Equity does not provide emergency services. For emergency assistance please consider the following information:

  • Campus Safety: 276-944-6222
  • The Powell Resource Center: 276-944-6144 (typically open Monday-Friday,8AM-5PM, located in Wiley 220; on-call counselors are available after business hours by calling Campus Safety)
  • Call 911

Determining Violation(s) of the Policy

Factors to be considered in determining whether and the extent to which behavior(s) could be construed as unlawful discrimination or harassment may include, but are not limited to:

  • Frequency
  • Severity and pervasiveness of the conduct
  • Whether it is physically threatening
  • Degree to which the conduct interfered with an employee’s work performance or a student’s academic performance and/or full enjoyment of the academic/campus programs and services
  • The relationship between the alleged harasser and the subject or subjects of the harassment The severity and pervasiveness of the conduct is considered from both subjective and objective perspectives.

This policy complies with all relevant federal and state laws and Emory & Henry College statements and policies.

Procedures

Emory & Henry College has created procedures for the resolution of complaints alleging violation of its discrimination and harassment policy. While these procedures provide sanctions for behaviors that violate state and federal law and college conduct standards, more importantly, they also describe ways of resolving informally the various conflicts and disagreements that inevitably arise in a community distinguished by its diversity. These procedures are intended to provide fair, prompt, and consistent mechanisms for determining whether Emory & Henry’s discrimination and harassment policy has been violated and, if so, to provide appropriate resolution. The availability of these procedures to all individuals does not limit the responsibility of the college to ensure that the protections of this policy prevail throughout the college community and these procedures are not intended to impair or limit the right of any individual to seek a remedy available under state or federal law.

Restorative Justice Resolution

In a diverse academic community, disagreements and conflicts of various degrees of seriousness are inevitable, which may or may not rise to the level of a violation of the discrimination and harassment policy.  Many issues, whether they arise to a policy violation or not, are often best resolved informally, by direct communication between the individuals involved, or with the help of mediation by a third party  (Dean of Students, Director of Inclusion & Diversity, Director of Human Resources, Training & Compliance Coordinator).  Often, the most effective avenue for informal resolution of complaints is direct conversation with the person or persons alleged to have caused the offense; reasoned discussion of the issue will often bring about a resolution and new understanding. After coming to a resolution, there will be an informal written agreement which will be reviewed and signed by individuals involved of what actions will be taken to ensure continued resolution.  We strive to have this process completed within 60 business days.  The complainant, respondent, or college official may terminate a restorative justice process at any time and initiate the student conduct process.

Formal Complaint Procedures

An individual who chooses to pursue formal resolution of a complaint alleging violations of the college’s discrimination and harassment policy must begin by filing a formal written complaint with the Office of Human Resources. Once the Training & Compliance Coordinator has received a report and/or complaint, they will acknowledge the receipt of that report and/or complaint and provide an initial response within 3-5 business days. Note: Once a formal complaint is filed, parties involved can request a restorative justice process.

A formal complaint may be filed immediately after an alleged act of discrimination or harassment has taken place or after any efforts that may have been undertaken to reach an informal settlement has proven unsuccessful.  The complaint will be investigated, evaluated, and addressed within 60 business days of the date of acknowledgment. However, this timeframe may be extended by the Director of Human Resources or the institution upon a written petition by the complainant(s), or the respondent.  In determining whether to grant an extension, the Director of Human Resources or institution shall consider the salient factors of the particular case, which may include items such as the complexity and/or severity of the matter to be heard, the number of individuals involved in the particular matter, or whether the academic calendar makes it impractical to commence a hearing within the prescribed 60 days.

Filing a Complaint.  ​

Emory & Henry College is committed to providing a quality education and a learning environment for our students and welcomes input and opinions from our students.  Students can file a written complaint on the official complaint form or use the Campus Conduct Hotline (866-943-5787) to file a complaint anonymously. The student should submit a formal written and signed complaint to the Compliance & Training Coordinator who can be reached at rbowyer@ehc.edu or 276.944.6528. Their office is located on the 2nd floor of the Kelly Library. The Emory & Henry College official complaint form can be found in the Dean of Students Office or the Office of Human Resources.  Complaints must include the nature of the complaint, names, dates, and other specific information. Complaints must be submitted within 60 days of an incident. When a complaint is filed more than 60 days after the alleged incident, the Director of Human Resources will determine whether circumstances support a late filing of charges.

Preliminary Review.

​Some incidents are not clearly defined when the Office of Human Resources receives initial reports. For such cases, a Preliminary Review may be conducted to gather more information. This may include meeting with involved parties or witnesses and requesting statements and/or documents that will help determine whether charges, a formal investigation, or no actions are warranted.

Investigation.  ​A formal investigation is utilized when the Office of Human Resources receives allegations that, if substantiated, could warrant a student’s separation from the college. The investigation/evaluation process is conducted by trained investigators that include faculty and staff members of the Emory & Henry College community. Signed statements can be requested during this process. The investigation, which includes interviews with the parties and relevant witnesses and a collection of all relevant documents and other evidence, will culminate in a comprehensive investigation report that will be reviewed by the Dean of Students.  If the complaint is not complex in nature, it may be investigated by collecting statements and documents from complainant(s), respondent(s), and any relevant witnesses before a summary and a packet of information are provided to the Dean of Students for review. After review, the Dean of Students will determine whether there is a basis to file charges against a student(s) and at what level, if any, the matter should be resolved. The possible resolution recommendations from the Dean of Students are as follows:

  1. Disciplinary, Higher Level.​ Matters that may result in a sanction of suspension or above will be resolved through a Title VI Hearing.
  2. Disciplinary, Lower Level. Matters that will not result in a sanction of suspension or above will be resolved through a formal meeting with the Dean of Students who will determine a period of probation and student will be required to participate in a Title VI educational program. A formal written agreement will be established which will be reviewed and signed by individuals involved of what actions will be taken to ensure continued resolution. Violation of probation at this level will result in higher-level sanctions.
  3. Non-disciplinary Actions/Referrals. If it is determined that a hearing or a formal meeting with the Dean of Students is not necessary, the matter may be addressed with a warning letter or a Dean of Students conference and are referral to mediation or counseling. Student may also be required to participate in a Title VI educational program and will be required to sign an informal agreement of what actions will be taken to ensure continued resolution.
  4. No Action. If there is no basis to file charges and no follow up is warranted, the Dean of Students may recommend that the Office of Student Life close the case and take no action.
  5. Withdrawing Charges. The Dean of Students has the authority to withdraw charges once they have been made.

  Title VI Hearings

Title VI Pre-Hearing Procedures:

 Notice.​ 

At least seven (7) days before the hearing, the Training & Compliance Coordinator will provide the respondent(s) with written notification of the charges, the time and place of the hearing, and a copy of the case materials.  The complainant(s)also receives the case materials.

Expedited Hearing(s).  

If the Dean of Students determines that an expedited hearing is necessary (e.g. end of the academic year), the notice may be provided fewer than seven (7) days before the hearing.

Requests for Witnesses.

The respondent(s) and complainant(s) will provide the Dean of Students with a written list of witnesses they would like to appear at the hearing at least four (4) days prior to the hearing by 9:00AM.  For cases in which an investigator is not used, all witnesses will provide a written statement and/or any relevant documents at least four (4) days prior to the hearing by 9:00 AM. If, after the four-day deadline, either party believes that there is new information which may substantially influence the outcome of the hearing, they will request of the Dean of Students that the information be admitted to the hearing. The Dean of Students will also notify the parties of any other witnesses who have been called to appear at the hearing. The Dean of Students will make all decisions about witnesses appearing at the hearing.

Advisors.

The respondent(s) and complainant(s) will also specify whether an advisor will be assisting them and if so, the name of the person chosen.

Title VI Hearing Process.

The Title VI Hearing Panel is composed of a combination of 3 faculty and/or staff who are members of the Student Conduct Board system. The case will be heard by these community members and all investigative findings from the Dean of Students Office will be presented at the hearing. If there are additional code of conduct charges stemming from the same incident, all charges will be processed during the Title VI hearing. Both the complainant and respondent will be given an opportunity to make a statement and be questioned by panel members.  These proceedings are not adversarial actions.

Hearing Process Accommodations.

Any complainant can request to give their testimony without being in the physical presence of the person they are accused. Screens, teleconference, or closed-circuit broadcasts may be permitted, but not to the disadvantage of the respondent. It will be the hearing officer’s responsibility to ensure that all testimonies are presented in a fair and impartial manner.  

Title VI Hearing Procedures

Title VI hearings proceed as follows:

  1. The Dean of Students reads the charge(s) and informs the respondent(s) of the right to remain silent.
  2. The Dean of Students is available to answer questions about the case materials.
  3. The respondent may make an opening statement.
  4. The complainant may make an opening statement.
  5. The hearing panel examines the evidence and the testimony of any witnesses, including asking the respondent and complainant. The respondent(s) and the complainant(s) may ask questions of all witnesses who are called to the hearing. It may be required that all questions be directed through the Dean of Students. At the discretion of the Dean of Students, witnesses may be recalled.
  6. The complainant may make a closing statement.
  7. The respondent may make a closing statement.
Deliberations.​ 

Following the closing statements, the Title VI Hearing Panel adjourns into closed session (1) to determine if the respondent(s) is responsible for violation(s) of the discrimination and harassment policy and, if so, (2) to recommend an appropriate sanction up to Expulsion from the college; including accompanying terms to the Dean of Students. After a determination of responsibility but prior to the recommendation of a sanction, the Dean of Students informs the panel of any prior disciplinary finding(s) against the respondent. The decision(s) of the Title VI Hearing Panel will be made by majority vote and will be forwarded to the Dean of Students.  Within five (5) days of the conclusion of the hearing, the Dean of Students will notify the respondent(s), and the complainant(s) as permitted by applicable regulations, of the outcome of the case.

Appeals.

Appeals can be made by respondent or complainant and must be filed within 3 days of notice of conclusion.  Appeals can be made on the grounds of violation of hearing procedures, violation of student rights, introduction of new evidence that was not available at the time of the original hearing, and/or excessive or inconsistent sanctions.  All appeals must be in writing and submitted to the Dean of Students Office within three (3) academic days of written notification. The appeals must be based on one or more of the following reasons:   (1) new, material evidence that was unavailable at the time of the investigation and hearing process, (2) procedural error that may have impacted the outcome of the matter, and (3) inappropriate sanction based on the finding. Mere dissatisfaction with the outcome is not a reason for appeal.  At the end of the appeal filing time, both the respondent and the complainant will be notified if any appeals are received.

Appeals Process.

​The Dean of Students will provide case materials and any new evidence to the Vice President of Student Life and the Director of Human Resources who will make a final decision regarding sanction.

  Policy on Sexual and Gender-based Harassment and Discrimination and Other Forms of Interpersonal Violence  

  1. Title IX Defined

Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 is a Federal civil rights law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in education programs and activities. All public and private elementary schools, school districts, colleges, and universities receiving any Federal funding must comply with Title IX. Under Title IX, discrimination on the basis of sex can include sexual harassment, sexual assault, and rape, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking. Title IX also applies to discrimination of pregnant and parenting students and discrimination in the classroom or in other programs and activities based on sex or gender. 

Important Definitions
  • Complainant: ​the individual who has allegedly been a victim of Prohibited Conduct
  • Respondent:​ the individual who is alleged to have violated the policy 
  • Third-Party/Reporting Party:​ an individual who has not experienced but is aware of the occurrence of Prohibited Conduct and reports the violation
  • Confidential Employee:​ (1) any Employee that is a licensed medical, clinical, or mental health professional and ordained clergy (e.g., physicians, nurses, physician’s assistant, psychologists, psychiatrists, professional counselors) when acting in that professional role in the provision of services to a patient who is a Student
  • Responsible Employee:  Any College employee who is not a Confidential Employee. A Responsible Employee is required by law to report to the College’s Title IX Coordinator all relevant details (obtained directly or indirectly) about an incident of Prohibited Conduct that involves any Student as a Complainant, Respondent, and/or witness, including dates, times, locations, and names of parties and witnesses. 
  • Retaliation:​ any adverse action or threat taken or made against an individual, including through third parties and/or legal counsel, for making a report of Prohibited Conduct or participating in any investigation or proceeding related to this policy. (Applies to both parties.)
  • Amnesty:​ All students, acting in good faith, who disclose any incident of Prohibited Conduct under these procedures to a college official or to law enforcement shall not be subject to action use occurring at or near the time of the commission of the Prohibited Conduct. The College will address this by providing support, education, and resources to the student(s).
  • Advisor:​ Students involved in a Title IX report and/or investigation are entitled to a support person who can be present with them during meetings and interviews and provide moral support. The person chosen can be a College Employee or someone not affiliated with the College. These individuals can attend the hearing but are prohibited to participate in the hearing. ​For more information see​: ​VI-​ ​How to Make a Report and Resources ​    
  • Interim Measures:​  Are those services, accommodations, or other assistance that the College puts in place for Complainants after receiving notice of alleged sexual misconduct but before any final outcomes – investigatory, disciplinary, or remedial – have been determined. (e.g. changes to class schedules, work schedule, living arrangements, etc.) 
  • No Contact Order: ​ Prohibits a person from being in physical or verbal contact with someone and includes contact through Third Parties or through the use of technology (text messages, social media, etc.) 
Statement of Policy

Emory & Henry College is a community of trust whose existence depends upon strict adherence to standards of conduct set by its members. The College is committed to an atmosphere of human dignity in which effective collegial relationships are based on mutual respect. When an individual’s gender or sexuality falls victim to a lack of respect, the collegial nature of the institution is threatened. Sexual misconduct is a serious violation of these standards and threatening, offensive, violent, or harassing behavior will not be tolerated. The College encourages all members of the Emory & Henry College community to be aware of both the consequences of sexual misconduct and the options available to victims of sexual misconduct and the accused. Sexual misconduct includes, but is not limited to, discrimination, sexual assault, sexual harassment, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking. Emory & Henry College also formally forbids retaliation against an individual for making a report of Prohibited Conduct under this policy or for participating in an investigation of an alleged violation of this policy. 

This policy is in compliance with applicable legal requirements including Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972; relevant provisions of the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013; Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964; the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act; and other applicable federal and Virginia state laws.

To Whom This Policy Applies

This policy applies broadly to the entire College community, including undergraduate and graduate students; those employed by Emory & Henry College (E&H) including faculty, affiliates, visiting faculty and all staff (including all exempt and non-exempt, and senior administrative), as well as those physicians and health scientists who are not employed by E&H but have E&H affiliation with the School of Health Sciences; contractors, vendors, or other third parties contractually obligated to E&H (“Third Parties”), and visitors or guests of E&H (Invitees); all collectively together known as “Covered Persons”. This policy pertains to acts of Prohibited Conduct committed by or against Covered Persons when: 

  1. When conduct occurs on Emory & Henry College premises and/or
  2. the conduct occurs in the context of a Emory & Henry College employment, education, or research program or activity, including but not limited to E&H-sponsored study abroad, research, internship, mentorship, summer session, or other affiliated programs or premises; and/or
  3. the conduct occurs outside the context of  Emory & Henry College employment, education, or research program or activity, but (i) has continuing adverse effects on E&H premises or in any E&H employment, education, or research program or activity or (ii) occurs in close proximity to E&H premises and is connected to hostile conduct on E&H premises.

To implement this policy, the College has developed specific processes to investigate an allegation that a Covered Person has committed or been subject to an act of Prohibited Conduct that could implicate this policy. The College will select the appropriate process to use in a given situation based on the identity of the person alleged to have violated the policy (i.e., the “Respondent”).

Emory & Henry College administers a separate policy that addresses other forms of discrimination and harassment: the ​Title VI​ policy. This Title IX policy supersedes any conflicting provisions contained in the ​Title VI​ policy. Where Prohibited Conduct violates this policy and also violates the ​Title VI​ policy, the College’s response will be governed by the procedures referenced in this policy. ​Questions about which policy applies in a specific instance should be directed to the College’s Title IX Coordinator at 276-944-6112.

Prohibited Conduct Under this Policy

Conduct under this policy is prohibited regardless of the sex, sexual orientation and/or gender identity/expression of the Complainant or Respondent. Prohibited Conduct includes the following forms of behavior: ​Sexual Assault, Sexual Exploitation, Intimate Partner Violence, Domestic Violence, Stalking, Sexual or Gender-Based Harassment and/or Discrimination, Complicity, and Retaliation. 

 For more detailed information and specific definitions of these behaviors please reference

  • Student Resource Guide (Appendix A- 1)
  1. How to Make a Report and Available Resources

The College urges anyone who has been a victim of an act of sexual assault or rape to seek care immediately to address any medical concerns including those related to sexually transmitted infections, diseases, and pregnancy. 

Amnesty​:  All students, acting in good faith, who disclose any incident of Prohibited Conduct under these procedures to a college official or to law enforcement shall not be subject to action under the college’s Campus Code of Conduct for violation of alcohol and/or drug use occurring at or near the time of the commission of the Prohibited Conduct. The College will address this by providing support, education, and resources to the student(s).

Advisor​: All students involved in a Title IX case are entitled to a support person of their choice. This person may be a College Employee or someone not affiliated with the College. A student may choose outside legal counsel (retained at the student’s expense), or a family member or friend. 

An advisor is someone who will help the student navigate the student conduct process and is a silent participant during all official meetings. This means that the advisor may provide advice to the student outside of these meetings but may not advocate on behalf of a student, speak on behalf or instead of a student, or act in opposition to College policy during the course of the resolution of a complaint. The advisor may not question witnesses, undertake their own investigations, make statements, provide testimony or otherwise intercede in the student conduct process.  The College advises that students select an individual who they feel comfortable with and who will be able to spend the time required to be an effective advisor.  If outside legal counsel is chosen by a party as an Advisor, the Attorney must send a letter of representation to the Title IX Coordinator at earliest convenience.  Please contact the College’s Title IX office at 276-944-6112.  All advisors must complete the Advisor Designation and Authorization form and submit it to the Title IX Coordinator.  Contact the Title IX Coordinator or the Institutional Equity Officer for location of form.

Title IX Deputy Coordinators​:​

The College has appointed Title IX Deputy Coordinators who can activate the Title IX process in the absence of the Title IX Coordinator. Listed below are those appointed as such on the E&H campus: 

Ryan Bowyer                                                  Shannon Patterson

Wiley Hall                                                        Wiley Hall

276-944-6528                                                  276-944-6117

rbowyer@ehc.edu                                           spatterson@ehc.edu

 

The College recognizes that deciding whether to make a report of Prohibited Conduct and/or choosing how to proceed, including but not limited to filing a Complaint, are personal decisions. The following principles and values will guide Emory & Henry College as facts and circumstances permit: 

  • Emory & Henry respects a Complainant’s autonomy in making the determination regarding how to proceed, including whether to make a report and/or file a Complaint.
  • In limited circumstances, typically where a risk of imminent harm to an individual or others or a threat to the health and safety of the campus is determined to exist, the College may be required to take immediate actions upon receipt of Prohibited Conduct.
  • Emory & Henry is committed to educating and informing individual(s) regarding the choices and options available to them, including resources and processes inside and outside the College.
  • An individual may choose to seek assistance, support or guidance from a Confidential Resource on campus or in the community. A disclosure to a Confidential Resource does not constitute a report to the College.
  • Making a Report of Prohibited Conduct involves​: telling a Responsible Employee, verbally or in writing, about what occurred. An individual may choose to make a report: (1) to Emory & Henry College and/or (2) to external law enforcement. Reporting conduct is different from filing a Complaint. While reported conduct will be conveyed to the Title IX Office, individuals who wish to directly file a Complaint should speak with the Title IX Coordinator.

The College offers various resources for all Students and Employees to provide support and guidance in response to any incident of Prohibited Conduct. For comprehensive information on accessing College and community resources, including emergency and ongoing assistance; health, mental health, and victim-advocacy services; options for reporting Prohibited Conduct to the College and/or law enforcement; and available support with academics, housing and employment: 

  • Students should refer to the​: ​Student Resource Guide (Appendix A-2)
Accommodations/Interim Measures

Services, accommodations, or other assistance that the College puts in place for victims after receiving notice of alleged sexual misconduct but before any final outcomes – investigatory, disciplinary, or remedial – have been determined. The College wants students to be safe, to receive appropriate medical attention, and to get the help they need to heal and to continue to access their educational opportunities. The College wants students to understand their reporting options and how to access available interim measures. The College encourages victims of sexual misconduct to report those incidents to the College’s Title IX Coordinator or any Confidential Employee or Responsible Employee with whom the victim feels comfortable. The College recognizes that sexual violence is traumatic and may leave victims feeling overwhelmed and confused. This policy seeks to provide clear guidance regarding available resources and who can help in securing them.

Both the Complainant & Respondent have the right to reasonable accommodations/interim measures. An individual may request reasonable accommodations or assistance during these procedures at any time. ​Accommodations include​: a language interpreter, verbal, visual, or technology aids, adjusted class schedules and/or living arrangements, or behavior management support. (This is a non-exhaustive list. All requests for accommodations will be considered.) 

Confidential Disclosure Options

Students can seek support and report information to the following individuals within the College community who are licensed medical, clinical, or mental health professionals and who are working in that licensed capacity (e.g. physicians, nurses, physicians’ assistants, psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers, and professional counselors) and ordained ministers. These employees are Confidential Employees and will not disclose detailed information

about Prohibited Conduct to the College without the Student’s permission. ​Note:​ ​Confidential Employees are expected to report that they are aware of an incident but will not disclose the identity of those involved or details of the report.​ This allows the College to maintain an accurate account of violations, as required by the Clery Act, which occur while also preserving the privacy of the students who are survivors of assault or misconduct. Below is a list of Confidential Employees at E&H: 

  • Powell Resource Counselors
    • Location: Wiley Hall, 220 
    • Phone: 276-944-6144
    • After hours: 276-944-6222 and ask for the counselor on-call 
    • Todd Stanley, LPC: ​toddstanley@ehc.edu
    • Emily Lockhart, LCSW: ​elockhart@ehc.edu 
  • Director of Health Services 
  • E&H Chaplains
  • E&H UMC Pastor 
  • Assistant Athletic Director for Athletic Performance & Head Athletic Trainer
  • Associate & Assitant Athletic Trainers 

Non-Confidential Reporting Options –​Students may seek support and report information to the following individuals who are required​ to report the incident and the identity of those involved to the Title IX Coordinator which will activate a community response: 

  • Campus Police
    • Office: 276-944-6222
    • Cell: 276-356-7783
  • Title IX  Deputy Coordinator
  • Campus Confidential Conduct Line​: 1-866-943-5787
    • Note:​ This Conduct Line allows individuals to report Prohibited Conduct ​anonymously​. The information provided to this Conduct Line will be assessed by the Title IX Coordinator to determine how to proceed. 
  • All E&H Employees including faculty and coaching staff (Responsible Employees)
  • ​Local Law Enforcement 
    • 911
    • Abingdon Town Police: 276-628-3111
    • Marion Town Police: 276-783-8145
    • Smyth County Sheriff’s Office: 276-783-7204
    • Washington County Sheriff’s Office: 276-676-6000  
Time Frame for Reporting 

There is no time limit on reporting or filing Complaints of violations of this policy, although the College’s ability to respond fully may be limited with the passage of time. 

If the Respondent is no longer affiliated with Emory & Henry (e.g., a report is made after a student has left or graduated or an employee no longer works for Emory & Henry), the College will still provide reasonably available remedial measures, assist the Complainant in identifying external reporting options, and may take other appropriate action. 

Title IX Coordinator 

Under Title IX: 

No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance. 

The Title IX Coordinator is charged with monitoring the College’s compliance with Title IX; ensuring appropriate education and training; coordinating the College’s investigation, response, and resolution of all reports under this policy; and ensuring appropriate actions to eliminate Prohibited Conduct, prevent its recurrence, and remedy its effects. The Title IX Coordinator is available to meet with any Student, Employee, or Third Party to discuss this policy or the accompanying procedures. The College has also designated Deputy Title IX Coordinators who may assist the Title IX Coordinator in the discharge of these responsibilities. The Title IX Coordinator and Deputy Title IX Coordinators receive appropriate training to discharge their responsibilities. 

 Applicable Procedures Under this Policy
  1. Informal Resolution Process​: provides an effective means of communicating about the effects of behavior that can lead to resolving some disputes. The Complainant, Respondent, or a College Official may terminate an Informal Resolution Process at any time to initiate a Formal Resolution Process.
  2. Formal Resolution Process​: the Title IX office initiates an investigation of the reported sexual misconduct and will determine if a hearing is merited.
Preponderance of the Evidence

​ Emory & Henry College uses the standard of Preponderance of the Evidence to make determinations in Title IX cases. This means that there is a requirement that 50.01% of the evidence supports either that the Respondent is responsible or that the Respondent is not responsible; “What is more likely than not.” ​Appeals. ​Upon receipt of the determination, the Complainant and Respondent shall each have the right to submit a written appeal of the outcome of the Review. This shall be submitted to the College’s Dean of Students or their designee within three (3) business days. Complainants and Respondents seeking an appeal must specify the grounds for the request.

  1. New evidence and/or
  2. There was a breach of the College’s process.

 Any party who fails to file an appropriate written request for an appeal within three (3) business days waives their right to appeal. As this is an administrative educational process, the College strongly encourages Complainant and Respondent involved to author their own appeals/responses.

Transcript Notations

Pursuant to Virginia law (23.1-900),​ Emory & Henry College will request that the Registrar places a hold and/or notation on the academic transcript of any student who has been (1) suspended, (2) dismissed, or (3) who has withdrawn from the College while under investigation for an offense involving sexual violence under the institution’s code of Conduct. This notation will be removed if (a) a Student is subsequently found not responsible or (b) a Student who has been suspended for prohibited conduct pursuant to policy, has (i) completed the term and conditions of a suspension and (ii) has been determined by the College to be in good standing pursuant to all applicable academic and non-academic standards. Emory & Henry will notify each student that any such suspension, dismissal, or withdrawal will be documented on the student’s academic transcript. ​

Accommodations

It should be noted that if the College deems it necessary to remove the Respondent from College property during the initial investigation, the Respondent can be restricted from being on College property at their own expense.  

For more detailed information regarding these procedures please reference: 

  • Student Resource Guide Appendix A-3
Privacy and Confidentiality

The College is committed to protecting the privacy of all individuals involved in the investigation and resolution of a report under this policy. The College also is committed to providing assistance to help Students, Employees, and Third Parties make informed choices. With respect to any report under this policy, the College will make reasonable efforts to protect the privacy of participants, in accordance with applicable state and federal law, while balancing the need to gather information to assess the report and to take steps to eliminate Prohibited Conduct, prevent its recurrence, and remedy its effects. 

Privacy and confidentiality have distinct meanings under this policy:

Privacy: ​information related to a report of Prohibited Conduct will be shared with a limited circle of College Employees who “need to know” in order to assist in the assessment, investigation, and resolution of the report. All Employees involved in the College’s response to reports of Prohibited Conduct receive specific training and guidance about sharing and safeguarding private information in accordance with state and federal law.  ​Confidentiality: ​Confidentiality exists in the context of laws that protect certain relationships, including medical and clinical care providers (and those who provide administrative services related to the provision of medical and clinical care), mental health providers, counselors, and ordained clergy, all of whom may engage in confidential communications under Virginia law. The College has designated individuals who have the ability to have privileged communications as “Confidential Employees”. When information is shared by an individual with a Confidential Employee or a community professional with the same legal protections, the Confidential Employee (and/or such community professional) cannot reveal the information to any third party except when an applicable law or a court order requires or permits disclosure of such information. For example, information may be disclosed when: (i) the individual gives written consent for its disclosure; (ii) there is a concern that the individual will likely cause serious physical harm to self or others; or (iii) the information concerns conduct involving suspected abuse or neglect of a minor under the age of 18. 

Violations of Law

Behavior that violates this policy may also constitute a crime under the laws of the jurisdiction in which the incident occurred. For example, the Commonwealth of Virginia criminalizes and punishes some forms of Sexual Assault, Intimate Partner Violence, Sexual Exploitation, Stalking, and Physical Assault. The criminal statutes that may apply in cases of Physical Assault and Intimate Partner Violence are found in various sections of Chapter 4, Articles 1 (Homicide) and 4 (Assaults and Bodily Wounding), of Title 18.2 of the Code of Virginia. The criminal statutes relating to Sexual Assault are found in Sections 18.2-61 to 18.2-67.10 of the Code of Virginia. Section 18.2-60.3 of the Code of Virginia defines and identifies the penalty for criminal stalking. Finally, Sections 18.2-386.1 and 18.2-386.2 of the Code of Virginia provide for criminal penalties in some cases of Sexual Exploitation. This compilation of criminal statutes is not exhaustive, but is offered to notify the College community that, some forms of Prohibited Conduct may also constitute crimes under Virginia law, which may subject a person to criminal prosecution and punishment in addition to any sanctions under this policy. 

Prevention & Awareness Programming

Emory & Henry College was awarded a $300,000 grant from the Justice Department’s Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) that has enabled the College to provide new resources to help students who are victims and provide prevention programming to the entire campus. Through this grant, the College established the E&H CARES program. Dr. Alana Simmons, E&H CARES Project Coordinator, coordinates the grant and develops and provides prevention programming for both the E&H campus and the School of Health Sciences. 

Emory & Henry College has adopted a new training, “Bringing in the Bystander”, that students will participate in beginning fall, 2018. “Bringing in the Bystander” is an interactive, researched, and evaluated curriculum that uses a community of responsibility approach. It teaches bystanders how to safely intervene before, during, and after an incident of sexual abuse, relationship violence, and stalking. The College previously used a training model, Step Up, to educate students on bystander intervention. 

Various programs are offered on campus to individual students, clubs and organizations throughout the year. Prevention and awareness information, in addition to Title IX guidance, is provided to all new faculty and staff during employee orientation periods. This information is also covered at the first faculty meeting each academic year. The Institutional Equity Officer provides Title IX guidance and training throughout the year to faculty, staff, and students. 

As a matter of informing the entire campus community, this Annual Safety Report and other safety information is included in the campus newsletter, The Scoop. The Scoop is published each weekday during the fall and spring semesters and the information is highlighted during the first few weeks of each semester.

In addition, Peer Educators offer the Red Flag Campaign annually. This program is a public awareness campaign designed to address dating violence and to promote the prevention of dating violence on college campuses. Other prevention and awareness campaigns are provided throughout the year for all students, faculty, and staff.

Training 

The College provides training to Students and Employees to ensure they understand this policy and the topics and issues related to maintaining an education and employment environment free from harassment, discrimination, and violence. The College provides this training to Employees during orientation of new employees, during the first faculty meeting of each academic year, and on-going training is provided by the Compliance and Training Coordinator and the E&H CARES Project Coordinator throughout the academic year to Students and Employees. 

Review the Student Handbook Appendix A:  Student Resource Guide to Title IX.

  Code of Student Conduct

Introduction

Emory & Henry College Student Government seeks to provide an atmosphere in which intellectual, religious, moral, and social growth may take place and thus assist the student toward personal fulfillment and responsible participation in the modern world.  To this end, the College seeks to insure freedom of inquiry and expression in teaching and learning. Since experience in total community is a part of the teaching-learning process, this freedom depends upon the appropriate opportunities and conditions in the classroom, on the campus, and throughout the College community. The administration, faculty, and student body therefore, have basic responsibilities toward realizing the purposes of Emory & Henry College through establishing programs and policies and setting standards of scholarship and conduct which are appropriate to these objectives.

Expectations of student conduct are defined in various College publications as well as communicated through groups and organizations of the College community by meetings, publications, and contracts. It is the student’s obligation to conduct themselves as a responsible citizen, to abide by the stated rules and regulations of the College and to express themselves in an orderly manner.

STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES 

General Information

Responsibility for good conduct rests with students as individuals. All members of the campus community are expected to use reasonable judgment in their daily lives to show concern for the welfare and rights of others. Educational institutions are not sanctuaries from the jurisdiction of the civil and criminal laws of the communities and states where such institutions exist.  If in violation of city, state, or federal laws, the student maybe prosecuted by those authorities, as well as by College authorities if the conduct violates College standards. Some prohibited conduct may necessitate response through both the Academic and Non-Academic processes of the Code of Student Conduct.

Students are entitled to be secure in their personal privacy, but the College will conduct facility inspections for maintenance, health, or safety purposes. Also, the College may conduct search and seizure operations when the health and safety of persons or property are involved.

To serve the interests of all students, the College may decline admission, suspend enrollment, or administratively withdraw a student from the College based on violations of the Code of Student Conduct.  A student is not in good disciplinary standing with the College while suspended, on disciplinary probation or has past due sanctions/action plans. 

Students agree to abide by all rules and regulations of the College a condition of admission.  Any violation of the Code of Student Conduct that occurs between the time of acceptance and enrollment at the College may be subject to review by the Dean of Students. 

Rights of the Respondent

Persons alleged to have violated the College’s rules and regulations have the following rights

  • a) written/electronically mailed notice of the charge(s), account of the alleged misconduct and notice of the scheduled hearing;
  • b) the right to a hearing;
  • c) the right to a timely student conduct process and decision;
  • d) the right to challenge the admissibility of information;
  • e) the right to appeal;
  • f) the preponderance of the information is the standard of proof used to determine if a violation has occurred;
  • g) the right to a personal adviser whose role is to advise the student rather than actively represent;
  • h) the right to participate in the conduct hearing or remain silent;
  • i) the right to present witnesses and a reasonable number of character statements;
  • j) a written decision specifying the violation, outcome, and right of appeal;
  • k) the right to challenge the seating of any hearing officer for good cause;
  • l) the right to have the case heard only on the misconduct specified in the written notice;
  • m) the right to question all available witnesses;
  • n) the right to request a reasonable postponement of the hearing; and
  • o) the right to face their accuser. (Special conditions may be imposed in sensitive cases.)
  • p) the right to have any ADA accommodations for visible and non-visible disabilities. ​Under the ADA, you have a disability if you have a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits a major life activity. The ADA also protects you if you have a history of such a disability. For more information, please see:  https://www.ada.gov/pubs/adastatute08.pdfhttps://www.ehc.edu/powell-resource-center/disability-support-services/

The College will make every effort to protect the rights and dignity of persons responding to or victims/complainants of violations of this code within limits provided by the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and other federal, state, and local laws. In accordance with FERPA, prior consent is not required to disclose personally identifiable information to schools at which a student intends to enroll. Regarding these requests, the College will make an attempt to notify the student that records are being provided.

Rights of a Person Filing a Complaint and/or Victim of Offense
  1. A person who has filed a complaint or is the victim of an offense will have the following rights:
  2. a) the right to review the statements of the student who is the subject of the alleged violation;
  3. b) the right to present information supporting the victim’s/complainant’s version of the alleged violation; and
  4. c) in cases of violence and Title IX violations, the right to know (or have next of kin know in case of death of victim) the outcome, including elements of the sanctions/action plans from the hearing.

The College will make every effort to protect the rights and dignity of victims/complainants of violations of this code within the limits provided by FERPA and other federal, state, and local laws.

  Security and Acceptable Use of the Campus Network and Technology Policy 

The Information Technology Services department, with the oversight of the College’s Executive Council, determines the campus network and technology security and acceptable use policy in accordance with the security and preservation needs of Emory & Henry College, best practices in the IT industry, and in compliance with federal, state, and local legal requirements.  All students, faculty, staff, and others affiliated with Emory & Henry College receiving a network access account must adhere to the following policies and guidelines. Employment or enrollment at Emory & Henry College signifies agreement to abide by all rules, regulations and policies of the College. Please note that all policies are subject to change.  Notification of changes will be posted.  This document will be reviewed and published regularly on the College website and in various official College publications such as the Student Handbook, Faculty Handbook and the Staff Handbook. All network users must adhere to the most current published revision.  

Guests of the College utilizing Internet access through the College’s network are expected to practice good Internet citizenship in their online activities, so as to avoid reflecting negatively on Emory & Henry College.  Specifically, they must adhere to all local, state, and federal laws, not download illegally obtained copyright protected materials and not access websites or materials which are not in keeping with the teaching, research, and educational goals of the institution. Anyone affiliated with Emory & Henry College who allows minor children to utilize public access computers on campus must be responsible for the actions of those children and should remember that Emory & Henry College does not have any filtering hardware or software in place for Internet content. Guests will have limited access to network resources.  

All students, faculty, and staff have a network account assigned to them for their individual use while at Emory & Henry College.  Emory & Henry College computerized information systems exist to promote shared access to computing, communication, and information necessary to serve the teaching, research, and administrative needs of the entire campus community.  These systems and the data they contain are vital resources of considerable monetary and intellectual value, in addition to important personal information which must be handled in a secure and confidential manner. Access to computer systems and networks, including email and web material placed on or distributed through the systems and networks owned or operated by Emory & Henry College is a privilege, not a right, and requires adherence to College policies and to federal, state, and local laws. Thus, all account holders of the College’s information facilities have a responsibility to use these systems in a respectful, ethical, professional, and legal manner.  

The purpose of the network is to support the teaching, research, and administrative needs of the College.  The network is not designed nor intended to support the downloading of copyrighted material, such as unlawfully obtained music, videos, and software. Such activities are not permitted at any time.  Non-academic online activities, such as gaming and streaming, are allowed, but Emory & Henry cannot guarantee full support of all systems. This policy pertains to all mobile devices, computers, printers, scanners, networks, Internet connections, and communication systems transmitting voice, data, or video information owned or leased by the College or connected to the College network. Appropriate use is always ethical, reflects academic honesty, the security, and confidentiality of personal information, and shows restraint in the consumption of shared resources.  

All users of Emory & Henry information facilities are required to demonstrate respect for intellectual property, ownership of data, system security mechanisms, and the individual’s right to privacy and freedom from intimidation, harassment, and unwarranted annoyance. While recognizing the respect for privacy, the College cannot guarantee confidentiality in the use of any College information system. Electronic records retained on College systems are subject to state and federal Privacy Acts, the Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 (USA PATRIOT Act), and Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies (CALEA), as well as Freedom of Information Acts. World Wide Web information located in designated web directories will be considered public information if “read” access is granted.  Access to and the utilization of data contained within College administrative, academic, and student support administrative systems are also subject to Family Educational RightsandPrivacyAct (FERPA) regulations and authorized users agree under this acceptable use policy to adhere to and abide by FERPA privacy and security guidelines. Student and staff medical and counseling records may be subject to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) regulations and must be accessed and handled in accordance with those established guidelines and regulations. Please note: no confidential data should be stored on any non-Emory & Henry owned and operated file storage solutions, including, but not limited to, third-party cloud storage.

Appropriate Use Guidelines 

In making appropriate use of resources Emory & Henry students, faculty, and staff must: 

  • Be consistent with the purposes of the network. It is designed to support research, education and administrative needs of students, faculty, staff, and administrative personnel.
  • Assume responsibility for material on personal web pages.
  • Use copyrighted materials only with the proper approval by the copyright holder or in compliance with “Fair Use” guidelines as described in current federal copyright legislation.
  • Use resources only for appropriate purposes, such as, but not limited to, assignments given by instructors, college-related work, communication. Inappropriate use is described in the section below.
  • Discontinue use of a College public-access or lab computer for personal or recreational activities if no other resources are available for students to use for class assignments. Protect the individual’s user logon ID (user account) from unauthorized use. The individual is responsible for all activities on their user ID.
  • Access only files and data that belong to the individual user, that are publicly available, or to which the individual user has been given authorized access.
  • Use only legal versions of copyrighted software in full compliance with vendor license requirements. Do not make copies of copyrighted software for personal use.
  • Be considerate in the use of shared resources. Refrain from monopolizing systems, overloading networks with excessive data, or wasting computer time, connect time, disk space, printer paper, bandwidth, or other resources.

In making appropriate use of resources Emory & Henry students, faculty, and staff must NOT: 

  • Use another person’s user login ID and password at any time.
  • Allow another person other than the actual user to access a user account.
  • Use another person’s files or data with permission.
  • Use computer programs to decode passwords or access control information.
  • Attempt to circumvent or subvert system security measures.
  • Engage in any activity that might be harmful to computers or to any information stored thereon, such as creating or propagating viruses, disrupting services, or damaging files.
  • Use College systems for partisan political purposes, such as using electronic mail to circulate advertising for political candidates.
  • Transmit, distribute, upload, post, or store any material in violation of any applicable law or regulation, or that encourages conduct that could constitute a criminal offense, gives rise to civil liability or otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law or regulation. This includes, without limitation, material protected by copyright, trademark, trade secret or other intellectual property right used without proper authorization.
  • Transmit, distribute, upload, post, or store any material that is obscene, defamatory, libelous, unlawful, harassing, abusive, threatening, harmful, vulgar, constitutes an illegal threat, violates export control laws, hate propaganda, fraudulent material or fraudulent activity, or invasive of privacy or publicity rights.
  • Use College resources to create personal web pages containing (1) pornography or (2) abusive and/or profane language.
  • Place digital photographic or recording equipment of any kind in any public space on campus without the prior written permission of the Dean of Students.
  • Waste computing resources, for example, by intentionally placing a program in an endless loop or by printing excessive amounts of paper.
  • Use the College’s resources for money-making activities as these can jeopardize Emory & Henry’s non-profit status. The network may not be used to advertise a commercial business, or to support a personal business interest. Neither may electronic mail be utilized to circulate advertising for products.
  • Engage in any other activity that does not comply with the general principles presented above.
  • Peer-to-peer file sharing is now prohibited at Emory & Henry College in compliance with the U.S. Higher Education Act. Downloading movies, music, or other

Copyrighted materials without permission of the copyright holder is strictly forbidden.  There are numerous legal and legitimate sites in the World Wide Web for the downloading of materials, such as iTunes.com and Rhapsody.com. The College recommends that anyone wishing to download music or other copyrighted materials utilize legal means to do so. 

  • Any non-computing device must be approved and registered through the IT Help Desk before it can be connected to the network. Kelly Library and IT Services reserves the right to restrict devices accessing the network.
  • The E&H wireless network does not accept non-College access points. Personal wireless access points, hubs, and routers are strictly forbidden.
  • Any Computers connected to the Emory & Henry network are strictly forbidden to function as hosts for network services such as peer-to-peer, file-sharing, local area networks (LAN), etc.

Abuse of Email Privileges 

E-mail and network connectivity are a privilege, not a right. These privileges can be revoked for violations of this Acceptable Use policy. Unacceptable behavior includes, but is not limited to: 

  • Infringement on others’ privacy
  • Interference with others’ work
  • Copyright infringement
  • Illegal activity
  • Use of mass email for commercial or political mailings
  • Use of distribution lists for purposes other than teaching, research, and administrative needs of the College
  • Penalties for unacceptable behavior range from deactivation of the account through College judicial action or referral to law enforcement authorities. For minor first offenses, the Chief Information Officer/Director of the Library will notify the offender with a simple email warning.

Mass Email Guidelines 

Mass electronic mailings shall be concise and to the point. The use of attachments should be limited to small size files, such as MS Word and Excel files. Larger files can be posted on the password-protected section of the website or on the learning management system. To post a document on the web site, please contact Public Relations. If you need assistance with the learning management system, please contact the Instructional Technologist. Mass email is recognized as an important medium for facilitating communication within the Emory & Henry community. However, the potential misuse of mass e-mail is also recognized.  The policies and procedures found in this document attempt to provide guidance for the appropriate use of the All Employees email distribution list.  

Remember that the College’s official internal electronic newsletter, The Scoop (not email), should be used for all general College-related announcements and for providing information about programs, projects, and activities. If you need assistance with including these events in the College’s electronic calendar, please contact Public Relations. If you are unsure about where to post an announcement, please contact the Help Desk for assistance. In addition, discussion forums should be set up through the use of moodle(not email).  If you need assistance with setting up a Moodle account for a discussion forum, contact Valerie Lewis, Instructional Technologist, at vlewis@ehc.edu.  

Mass email lists should be used only for the following purposes:

  • Instructions from the faculty marshal and/or staff that do not seem appropriate for other communication media.
  • Communication from the chair of the staff affairs committee for all faculty and/or staff that does not seem appropriate for other communication media.
  • Communication from senior administrators for all faculty and/or staff that does not seem appropriate for other communication media.
  • Communication from individual faculty or staff of general interest to a majority of faculty and/or staff that does not seem appropriate for other communication media.
  • Distribution of faculty and staff surveys.
  • Reports from faculty or staff committees or task forces of general interest to a majority of the faculty and/or staff.
  • Reports from the faculty or staff representative to the Board of Trustees.
  • Reports from the governance groups (Faculty Advisory Committee, the Staff Affairs Council, etc.).

Urgent Messages 

Urgent mass emails are reserved for highly important, time-sensitive emergency notices. In those cases, faculty and staff need to contact one of the following offices and request the message to be distributed to the College-wide community.  Urgent messages must be sent in plain text and contain no graphics, bolding, or other HTML formatting. The following is a list of the offices authorized to distribute mass emails to the campus-wide community:  

  • President’s Office
  • VP for Academic Affairs
  • VP for Student Life
  • Campus Police/Security
  • VP for Business and Finance
  • Chaplain’s Office
  • Centralized Student Assistance
  • Physical Plant
  • Library/IT

Urgent messages include the following: 

  • Messages concerning emergency, health, and safety: bomb or terrorist threat; natural disaster alert; mechanical failures; weather closures or delays; crime alerts; and computer virus alerts;
  • Health alerts.
  • Logistics announcements: construction closures; traffic routing; and ozone or environmental alert notices.
  • Messages pertaining to matters of college-wide policy.
  • Messages of a timely nature having a direct impact on large numbers of faculty, staff, or students.

Web pages on College Servers

The privilege of presenting material on the College web site can be revoked, with or without cause, at the College’s discretion. Web pages found to be in non-compliance may be removed immediately by the web administrator or upon failure to revise web pages and conform to these guidelines. 

Accessing Data in the Administrative Systems of Emory & Henry College

The College recognizes that personnel must have access to student records and other data that is protected under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) in order to conduct the legitimate business of the College.  All Emory & Henry College administrative system users agree that use of systems maintained by partners, consortia arrangements, etc. is governed by the rules and regulations set forth in this policy.  Acceptance of this policy implies cooperation with the spirit and intent of any complementing acceptable use policies which may be provided by E&H’s service providers. College personnel must adhere to the following policies: 

  • Computers logged into Datatel, Raiser’s Edge, or other administrative system applications, must never be left unattended. All users should log out of these systems whenever it is not in active use. No faculty or staff, office or department, should share administrative system accounts.
  • Student work access to administrative systems must be strictly supervised and must be conducted only through the use of an authorized student assistant administrative system access account.
  • Administrative users should not store any confidential data on hard drive, flash memory sticks, or other portable storage media. All confidential data derived from administrative systems must be stored and shared via secure password-protected folders on the network.
  • Confidential data in reports, spreadsheets, or other formats must not be emailed to other personnel. It should be stored and retrieved from password-protected folders on the network.
  • Personnel working from remote locations or taking work off-campus on laptops or other portable devices must not download any data which falls under the protection of FERPA or HIPAA regulations.
  • Students, faculty, employees, and others authorized by consortia partners on shared systems may be provided an account on the partner’s information networks. Account privileges may include, but are not limited to, secured network storage, networked applications, databases, and Web services.
  • All permanent employees who need to access the administrative systems of consortia partners will receive user account information from the consortia partner’s network administrators through the Emory & Henry Library and IT department, which is the liaison between the College and the consortia partner. Access will be revoked immediately upon termination or at the end of the last day of employment. 
  • Users shall under no circumstances represent themselves as others for the purpose of circumventing established policies or security measures, or for any reason without explicit permission of the others. Sharing accounts and/or passwords is a violation of this policy.

Enforcement 

The Information Services Department reserve the right to enforce this policy as deemed necessary to protect the security of the network, data and files, as well as the rights and privileges of its users. These policies have been developed in consultation with IT directors from the Council of the Independent Colleges of Virginia member institutions and represent widespread practices in public and private institutions of higher education throughout the United States.   

Emory & Henry College considers any violation of appropriate use principles or guidelines to be a serious offense and reserves the right to copy, examine, and remove any files or information resident on College systems allegedly related to unacceptable use and behavior. Violation of these rules will be reported to the appropriate campus office for further action. Punishments may include temporary or permanent suspension of user privileges on the network and/or disconnection from the campus network, or other sanctions as described in the Faculty and Faculty Status handbooks, the Staff handbook, or the Student handbook. Offenders may be prosecuted under laws including (but not limited to) the Privacy Protections Act of 1974, the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act of 1986, the Computer Virus Eradication Act of 1989, the Interstate Transportation of Stolen Property statutes, the Virginia Computer Crimes Act, the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, and the Telecommunications Act of 1996.

Cooperation with Law Enforcement Investigations 

The proper procedures for staff members in the Emory & Henry Library and Information Services Department regarding cooperation with and participation in investigations of suspected misconduct involving the use of the campus network or technology hardware and/or software are as follows: 

  • When seeking technical support assistance from Library and Information Services staff, each student must sign a waiver which states that the department may look at the student’s personal computer files in the course of completing the requested technical support. The waiver authorizes the department to view the content of the computer’s hard drive(s) in the course of completing any requested technical support assistance, if necessary, in assisting the computer user.
  • Should a department staff member discover potentially illegal activities, data, or files on a computer, they are to immediately document what they saw, why they came into contact with that data or file, and how they arrived there in terms of the directory structure. The staff member should take no direct action, but should notify the Director of Information Services immediately. If the Director of Information Services is unavailable, then they should notify the VP for Student Life without delay if a student is involved, or the VP for Business and Finance if an employee is involved. If none of these administrators are available, or if there is a genuine threat to public safety inferred in the discovered materials (e.g. bomb threats, plans for violent activities, etc.), then the staff member is authorized to notify Campus Security, or law enforcement officials directly if Campus Security is not available. 
  • Staff members are not to confiscate any personal computers or other technology that is not College-owned property.
  • Staff members are authorized to remove College-owned technology and return it to the Library and Information Technology department for removal of materials which violate the Security and Acceptable Use Policy with the approval of the Chief Information Officer/Director of the Library.
  • Staff members are authorized to boot up computers, open files, or examine directories or folders on College-owned and non-College-owned equipment for College officials, if requested, in the investigation of suspected infractions of the Security and Acceptable Use policy if the equipment in question has been connected to the Campus network.
  • Department staff members are not to release any information, data, or files, of any kind to law enforcement authorities without receipt of a properly-executed subpoena compelling the College to cooperate in a criminal investigation. Any questions or comments can be directed to the Chief Information Officer/Director of the Library.

  RN-BSN Program-Specific Policies

  Admission Requirements

All students must meet the following criteria:

  • Consideration for this program requires students to apply and receive acceptance into E&H College and the Post-Licensure RN-BSN program.
  • Be a graduate of an accredited Associate Degree of Nursing program or Diploma
  • Hold a current unencumbered RN license in the state which they
  • Submit official transcripts from all colleges or universities
  • For entry into the program, a minimum GPA of 33 or higher is required and is to be maintained throughout the program.
  • Criminal background
  • AHA BLS for Healthcare Providers certification prior to starting any clinical components of the
  • Licensed RNs can receive up to 39 hours of credit for knowledge gained in basic nursing program

Background Checks and Drug Screen Testing

Each nursing student will be responsible for obtaining a background check and drug screen testing provided through Castle Branch. The cost per student will be approximately $149.00. The background check will consist of:  County Criminal Record Search, National Criminal Record Search, National Sex Offender Index Search, Nationwide Healthcare Fraud and Abuse

Scan, Social Security Search, and Residency History Search (costs $44.00 one-time fee).  A standard 12-panel Urine Drug Analysis will be included and consist of: analysis for amphetamine (methamphetamine), barbiturates, benzodiazepine, cocaine, marijuana, Methadone, Methaqualone, opiates (codeine & morphine), phencyclidine, propoxyphene, oxycodone, and MDMA (cost $40.00 one-time fee). Students will also be required to complete a HIPAA and OSHA online training course with cost of $15.00 each. This will be an annual course to be completed each year of study.  Students will also pay a one-time $35.00 fee for the Compliance Tracker for all required documentation.

Immunizations

Prior to clinical placements, all students will be required to have proof of:  Negative TB test, two MMR vaccines, Chickenpox titer or proof of disease history, Tdap within the past 10 years. An annual influenza vaccine will be required or documentation of allergy to the influenza vaccine.

  RN to BSN Graduation Requirements

Academic graduation requirements include the following:

  1. Completion of 124 semester hours and all required RNs must successfully complete both the general education and required nursing courses.  Elective hours make up the remaining hours needed to graduate.
  2. Grade of C or better in all nursing
  3. A cumulative grade point average of 2.33 or higher for all courses taken at Emory & Henry College.

  Progression, Retention, Dismissal

  • Students must maintain a minimum grade of “C” in all nursing If a student receives a “D” or “F” in a nursing class, they must re-take that class.
  • The student will be expected to maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.33. If the student falls below the 2.33, the student will be placed on academic probation and will meet with their advisor to develop a probation plan with the pathway of being successful in their course(s).
  • If a student fails two nursing courses or fails one course twice, they will be dismissed from the nursing program.

  Practical Standards for Admission, Progression, and Graduation

The goal of the Emory & Henry College RN-BSN Nursing program is to enable every student to prepare to critically think and be competent and compassionate nurses in a changing healthcare environment. The endeavors of the RN-BSN program are to enhance nursing knowledge, practice, and professional integrity to develop improved health outcomes for patients, families, and communities in the continuum of care.

The student must be independently able to meet the practical standards of essential attributes of (1) physical skills; (2) intellectual skills; (3) interpersonal skills; and (4) performance skills.  If the student is unable to meet these practical standards, with or without equitable accommodation, the student will be unable to complete the program and will be advised/counseled accordingly.

Physical Skills

The student should have the ability to integrate, analyze, and synthesize patient data in a reliable and precise manner. Students need to have the ability to detect pain, pressure, position, temperature, movement, and vibration to gather information to formulate plans of care and to evaluate patient status. A student must have motor skills to respond immediately to situations of urgency in order to provide rapid care to patients.

Intellectual Skills

The student must be able to learn and assimilate knowledge gained through modalities of didactic lectures, clinical encounters, and life experiences. Students are required to gather subjective and objective data, analyze data, plan appropriate nursing care and interventions, and evaluate patient outcomes using thorough deliberation and sound clinical judgment.

Interpersonal Skills

The nurse must possess effective interpersonal skills essential for the profession of nursing. The nurse must be able to develop rapport and maintain interpersonal relationships with diverse patients, families, and communities with varied cultural, emotional, intellectual, religious, and social backgrounds. To be effective, the student must demonstrate ability to adapt to change; be flexible; acknowledge and assimilate constructive criticism in the classroom and clinical settings; and communicate effectively with other healthcare professionals; and to perform duties cooperatively and proficiently in the face of ambiguities characteristic in clinical practice.

Performance Skills

The rigors of performance of the student is to be maintained of the college, the School of Health Sciences, clinical agencies, and the nursing program to enhance the reputation of the nursing program, School of Health Sciences and college at large. The student must demonstrate the ability to acclimate and effectively function in stressful situations in the classroom and clinical environments. The student must be self-aware of multiple stressors encountered during the nursing program and initiate pro-active responses for self-care and stress management.

  Expected Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) for RN-BSN Program

  1. Synthesize from the liberal arts, nursing and sciences the theories and concepts in professional (Essential I)
  2. Application of critical thinking, clinical reasoning, and decision-making skills in providing quality nursing care to individuals, families, communities and (Essential II)
  3. Translate findings from research for the provision of evidence-based practice of (Essential III)
  4. Utilize information and technology in various settings to deliver quality patient (Essential IV)
  5. Apply leadership skills and knowledge of the healthcare, financial, and regulatory systems for the advancement of high quality, safe professional (Essential V)
  6. Exhibit effective inter-professional collaboration and communication to deliver quality, patient-centered (Essential VI)
  7. Apply ideologies of health promotion and prevention in delivering care to individuals, families, communities, and (Essential VII)
  8. Integrate into one’s professional practice the professional values, ethics, morals, and legal aspects associated with the profession of (Essential VIII)
  9. The development of one’s self, nursing practice, and the profession derives from the application process of lifelong learning (Essential IX)
  10. Demonstrate evolving competence in the individual’s professional role within a dynamic, multicultural, global

  Reference Format

All written assignments must be in the APA Format of writing style. The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, Sixth Edition will be followed.  APA referencing format for electronic resources can be accessed through the American Psychological Association web site – www.apa.org

  Confidentiality of Coursework

The communication of information in face-to-face or online courses which are based on personal or work-related experiences adheres to the policies and guidelines of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA).  Students are expected to maintain the confidentiality and privacy of patients, peers, family, or agency/institution by not disclosing information outside of courses. If needing to express some detailed information, anonymity should be maintained with the use of an alias or initials. For more information on these laws, please refer to the following websites:

FERPA - https://studentprivacy.ed.gov/?src=fpco HIPAA - https://hipaa.com/

  Academic Honesty in Nursing

The nursing profession expects a nurse to demonstrate ethical behaviors and personal integrity at a high level consistent with the Christian worldview as viewed by Emory & Henry College, School of Health Sciences, and the RN-BSN Nursing Program.  Academic honesty is an essential component of ethical behavior and personal integrity and is required of all students completing nursing education at Emory & Henry College and entering professional practice.

Examples of adverse academic integrity, but is not all-inclusive:

Cheating

  1. Obtaining or giving assistance on assignments, tests, quizzes or other program related
  2. Eradicating and/or copying questions on exams or
  3. Unapproved collaboration on academic activities or assignments with fellow students.

Plagiarism

  1. Verbatim replication of an author or another person’s work without recognition for
  2. Appropriating ideas from someone else and indicating them as your
  3. Preparation of academic work is completed by another person or

Fabrication

  1. Misrepresenting and concoction of citations, data, or
  2. Falsification or modifying documentation in the clinical
  3. Altering academic records

Course and clinical faculty will address all academic honesty violations with consideration of the evidence to determine the appropriate sanctions.

Sanctions are:

  1. First infraction
    1. On the course assignment suspected, a grade of zero (0) or “F”; OR
    2. A course grade of “F”, OR
    3. Dismissal from the
  2. Second infraction
    1. Immediate program dismissal, AND
    2. No readmission

Academic honesty violations and the sanction(s) imposed will be sent to the Vice President and Dean of the School of Health Sciences and the Office of the Provost. Further sanctions may be imposed if warranted. The student has the right to appeal the sanction according to the Student Handbook guidelines. Documentation will be thorough regarding the incident and disciplinary action and sanctions placed in the academic student file.

  Netiquette for online courses

Misconduct in online courses can create feelings of annoyance and frustration with the impact felt by the instructor and fellow classmates.  This behavior may cross the line into academic dishonesty and may be treated similarly to cheating or plagiarizing. These guidelines for online learners are warranted and require students to take them seriously to avoid a negative impact on their success in the course and program.

Security

Your password is the only thing which protects you from pranks or more serious harm.

  1. Follow the Emory & Henry College guidelines with respect to password
  2. Do not share your password with
  3. Change your password when prompted to do so by the E&H College website AND if you suspect someone might know your password.
  4. Always logout when you are finished using the system – especially if using a shared computer in a public

General Guidelines

  • Treat instructor(s) with respect, in email or any form of online
  • Always use the proper title for your professor: or Prof., or if you’re in doubt use Mr. or Ms.
  • Do not refer to your instructor by their first name, unless specifically given permission or invited to do so.
  • Use clear and concise Be respectful of the reader’s time and attention.
  • Ensure you use correct grammar and
  • Avoid slang terms, such as “whassup?” and using abbreviations in a text, such as “u” instead of “you”.
  • Standard fonts should be used for online reading in a consistent readable size (12 to 14 ).
  • Avoid using the caps lock feature as IT CAN BE INTERPRETED AS HOSTILE
  • Limit and possibly avoid the use of Not everyone knows how to interpret them.
  • Be cautious when using humor or sarcasm as tone is sometimes lost in an email or discussion post and your message might be taken literally or
  • Be careful with sharing personal information online (both yours and others).
  • In any health care course, follow the HIPPA guidelines – no sharing of patient information or emailing confidential patient

E-Mail Netiquette

Sending an email to your nursing instructor, clinical faculty, or fellow classmates should:

  • In the subject line, provide a clear and descriptive heading so there is a reason to open the
  • Be brief and to the point and try to avoid having the reader to scroll for the entire
  • Write the important part at the beginning as the reader may not read it in its
  • Avoid sending attachments unless you are sure the reader can open
  • Ensure there is a place at the end of your email which has your name, email address, and a contact phone
  • Before you “reply all” to an email, think before you Do all the recipients need to see your response?
  • If you are upset or angry about a situation, allow yourself 24-hours to calm down before you send or respond to an email so you can respond with a clear head.

Discussion Board Netiquette and Guidelines

  • Ensure posts are on topic and relevant to the course Re-read the instructions provided by the instructor if necessary.
  • View your posts seriously and edit if necessary, before Avoid poor grammar and sloppy writing with spelling errors.
  • When making a post, be brief and concise when making a thorough This is a discussion area and not a formal paper.
  • Cite all referenced to quoted
  • Read all the messages posted in the discussion prior to giving a
  • Ensure your post are your original ideas and not those of someone
  • Avoid replying to a post with “I agree” without supporting your reasoning and
  • Be respectful and considerate of other individuals’ opinions, which may differ from your Feel free to offer your differing opinion in a non-critical, respectful manner. Do not make insulting or personal remarks.
  • Be open-minded and receptive to leaning from your colleagues.

Communication via Technology

Communication is an essential component of the nursing profession, whether face-to-face interactions, phone, email or text. Formal communication is deemed appropriate through face-

to-face interaction or by email and informal communication is appropriate through phone conversation or text messages.

 Guidelines for Communication:
  1. Contact the professor to schedule a time during office hours for a face-to-face Instructors have office hours scheduled and many accept walk-in meetings if they are available.
  2. Phone messages received by 4:00 p.m. Monday – Friday will be responded to within 24-hours with the exception of illness or extenuating Phone messages received after 4:00 p.m. on Friday will be responded to on Monday with the exception of illness or extenuating circumstances.
  3. Email messages should include the class name and number in the subject line with the subject included (ex.: NURS 401: Health Assessment – Project Question). An email will be viewed in the student performance evaluation; thus, it should be formatted appropriately, have complete sentences with proper grammar and Emails received by 4:00 p.m. Monday – Friday will be responded to within 24 hours with the exception of illness or extenuating circumstances. Emails received after 4:00 p.m. on Friday will be responded to on Monday with the exception of illness or extenuating circumstances.
  4. Text messages will be acceptable at the discretion of the Instructors typically do not put all of the student’s phone numbers in their contacts.  It is important to identify yourself, the class, and your question (ex.:  Hello Dr. Jones. This is Alex and I am in your NURS 401 Health Assessment class…. then ask your question).  Text messages received by 4:00 p.m. Monday – Friday will be responded to on the same day with the exception of illness or extenuating circumstances.  Text messages received after 4:00 p.m. on Friday may not receive a response until Monday with the exception of illness or extenuating circumstances.  A text message received over a weekend in regards to a class or clinical assignment requiring completion over the weekend may be responded to in a timelier manner.

  APPENDIX A

  Standards of Professional Nursing Practice

“The Standards of Professional Nursing Practice are authoritative statements of the duties that all registered nurses, regardless of role, population, or specialty, are expected to perform competently” (ANA, 2015, p. 51).

STANDARD

DESCRIPTION

COMPETENCIES

I. Assessment

The registered nurse collects pertinent data and information relative to the healthcare consumer’s health or the situation.

* Collects pertinent data, including but not limited to demographics, social determinants of health, health disparities, and physical, functional, psychosocial, emotional, cognitive, sexual, cultural, age-related, environmental, spiritual/transpersonal, and economic assessments in a systematic, ongoing process with compassion and respect for the inherent dignity, worth, and unique attributes of every person.

* Recognizes the importance of the assessment parameters identified by WHO (World Health Organization), Healthy People 2020, or other organizations that influence nursing practice.

* Integrates knowledge from global and environmental factors into the assessment process.

*Elicits the healthcare consumer’s values, preferences, expressed and unexpressed needs, and knowledge of the healthcare situation.

* Recognizes the impact of one’s own personal attitudes, values, and beliefs on the assessment process.

* Identifies barriers to effective communication based on psychosocial, literacy, financial, and cultural considerations.

*Assesses the impact of family dynamics on healthcare consumer health and wellness.

*Engages the healthcare consumer and other interprofessional team members in holistic, culturally sensitive data collection.

* Prioritizes data collection based on the healthcare consumer’s immediate condition or the anticipated needs of the healthcare consumer or situation.

*Uses evidence-based assessment techniques, instruments, tools, available data, information, and knowledge relevant to the situation to identify patterns and variances.

*Applies ethical, legal, and privacy guidelines and policies to the collection, maintenance, use, and dissemination of data and information.

*Recognizes the healthcare consumer as the authority on their own health by honoring their care preferences.

*Documents relevant data accurately and in a manner accessible to the interprofessional team.

II. Diagnosis

The registered nurse analyzes assessment data to determine actual or potential diagnoses, problems, and issues.

* Identifies actual or potential risks to the healthcare consumer’s health and safety or barriers to health, which may include but are not limited to interpersonal, systematic, cultural, or environmental circumstances.

* Uses assessment data, standardized classification systems, technology, and clinical decision support tools to articulate actual or potential diagnoses, problems, and issues.

* Verifies the diagnoses, problems, and issues with the individual, family group, community, population, and interprofessional colleagues.

* Verifies the diagnoses, problems, and issues with the individual, family, group, community, population, and interprofessional colleagues.

* Prioritizes diagnoses, problems, and issues based on mutually established goals to meet the needs of the healthcare consumer across the health-illness continuum.

* Documents diagnoses, problems, and issues in a manner that facilitates the determination of the expected outcomes and plan.

STANDARD

DESCRIPTION

COMPETENCIES

III. Outcomes Identification

The registered nurse identifies expected outcomes for a plan individualized to the healthcare consumer or the situation.

* Engages the healthcare consumer, interprofessional team, and others in partnership to identify expected outcomes.

* Formulates culturally sensitive expected outcomes derived from assessments and diagnoses.

* Uses clinical expertise and current evidence-based practice to identify health risks, benefits, costs, and/or expected trajectory of the condition.

* Collaborates with the healthcare consumer to define expected outcomes integrating the healthcare consumer’s culture, values, and ethical considerations.

* Generates a time frame for the attainment of expected outcomes.

* Develops expected outcomes that facilitate coordination of care.

* Modifies expected outcomes based on the evaluation of the status of the healthcare consumer and situation.

* Documents expected outcomes as measurable goals.

* Evaluates the actual outcomes in relation to expected outcomes, safety, and quality standards.

IV. Planning

The registered nurse develops a plan that prescribes strategies to attain expected, measurable outcomes.

* Develops an individualized, holistic, evidence-based plan in partnership with the healthcare consumer and interprofessional team.

* Establishes the plan priorities with the healthcare consumer and interprofessional team.

* Advocates for responsible and appropriate use of interventions to minimize unwarranted or unwanted treatment and/or healthcare consumer suffering.

*Prioritizes elements of the plan based on the assessment of the healthcare consumer’s level of risk and safety needs.

*Includes evidence-based strategies in the plan to address each of the identified problems, or issues. These strategies may include but are not limited to: Promotion and restoration of health; Prevention of illness, injury, and disease; Facilitation of healing; Alleviation of suffering, and Supportive care.

* Incorporates an implementation pathway that describes steps and milestones.

* Identifies cost and economic implications of the plan.

*Develops a plan that reflects compliance with current statutes, rules and regulations, and standards.

*Modifies the plan according to the ongoing assessment of the healthcare consumer’s response and other outcome indicators.

* Documents the plan using standardized language or recognized terminology.

STANDARD

DESCRIPTION

COMPETENCIES

V.  Implementation

The registered nurse implements the identified plan.

*Partners with the healthcare consumer to implement the plan in a safe, effective, efficient, timely, patient-centered, and equitable manner (IOM, 2010).

*Integrates interprofessional team partners in implementation of the plan through collaboration and communication across the continuum of care.

* Demonstrates caring behaviors to develop therapeutic relationships.

* Provides culturally congruent, holistic care that focuses on the healthcare consumer and addresses and advocates for the needs of diverse populations across the lifespan.

* Uses evidence-based interventions and strategies to achieve the mutually identified goals and outcomes specific to the problem or needs.

* Integrates critical thinking and technology solutions to implement the nursing process to collect, measure, record, retrieve, trend, and analyze data and information to enhance nursing practice and healthcare consumer outcomes.

* Delegates according to the health, safety, and welfare of the healthcare consumer and considering the circumstance, person, task, direction, or communication, supervision, evaluation, as well as the state nurse practice act regulations, institution, and regulatory entities while maintaining accountability for the care.

* Documents implementation and any modifications, including changes or omissions, of the identified plan.

V – A Coordination of Care

The registered nurse coordinates care delivery.

* Organizes the components of the plan.

* Collaborates with the consumer to help manage health care based on mutually agreed-upon outcomes.

* Manages a healthcare consumer’s care in order to reach mutually agreed-upon outcomes.

* Engages healthcare consumers in self-care to achieve preferred goals for quality of life.

* Assists the healthcare consumer to identify options for care.

* Communicates with the healthcare consumer, interprofessional team, and community-based resources to effect safe transitions in continuity of care.

* Advocates for the delivery of dignified and holistic care by the interprofessional team.

* Documents the coordination of care.

V – B Health Teaching and Health Promotion

The registered nurse employs strategies to promote health and a safe environment.

* Provides opportunities for the healthcare consumer to identify needed healthcare promotion, disease prevention, and self- management topics.

* Uses health promotion and health teaching methods in collaboration with the healthcare consumer’s values, beliefs, health practices, developmental level, learning needs, readiness and ability to learn language preference, spirituality, culture, and socioeconomic status.

* Uses feedback and evaluations from the healthcare consumer to determine the effectiveness of the employed strategies.

* Uses technologies to communicate health promotion and disease prevention information to the healthcare consumer.

* Provides healthcare consumers with information about intended effects and potential adverse effects of the plan of care.

* Engages consumer alliance and advocacy groups in health teaching and health promotion activities for healthcare consumers.

* Provides anticipatory guidance to healthcare consumers to promote health and prevent or reduce the risk of negative health outcomes.

 

VI.  Evaluation

The registered nurse evaluates progress toward attainment of goals and outcomes.

* Conducts a holistic, systematic, ongoing, and criterion-based evaluation of the goals and outcomes in relations to the structure, processes, and timeline prescribed in the plan.

* Collaborates with the healthcare consumer and others involved in the care or situation in the evaluation process.

* Determines in partnership with the healthcare consumer and other stakeholders, the patient-centeredness, effectiveness, efficiency, safety, timeliness, and equitability (IOM, 2001) of the strategies in relation to the responses to the plan and attainment of outcomes. Other defined criteria (e.g., Quality and Safety Education for Nurses) may be used as well.

* Uses ongoing assessment data to revise the diagnoses, outcomes, plan, and implementation strategies.

* Shares evaluation data and conclusions with the healthcare consumer and other stakeholders in accordance with federal and state regulations.

* Documents the results of the evaluation.

 

Standards of Professional Nursing Practice

 

STANDARD

DESCRIPTION

COMPETENCIES

VII.  Ethics

The registered nurse practices ethically.

* Integrates the Code of Ethics for Nurses with Interpretive Statements (ANA, 2015) to guide nursing practice and articulate the moral foundation of nursing.

* Practices with compassion and respect for the inherent dignity, worth, and unique attributes of all people.

* Advocates for healthcare consumers’ rights to informed decision-making and self-determination.

* Seeks guidance in situations where the rights of the individual conflict with public health guidelines.

* Endorses the understanding that the primary commitment is to the healthcare consumer regardless of setting or situation.

* Maintains therapeutic relationships and professional boundaries.

* Advocates for the rights, health, and safety of the healthcare consumer and others.

*Safeguards the privacy and confidentiality of healthcare consumers, others, and their data and information within ethical, legal, and regulatory parameters.

* Demonstrates professional accountability and responsibility for nursing practice.

* Maintains competence through continued personal and professional development.

* Demonstrates commitment to self- reflection and self-care.

*Contributes to the establishment and maintenance of an ethical environment that is conducive to safe, quality health care.

* Advances the profession through scholarly inquiry, professional standards development, and the generation of policy.

* Collaborates with other health professionals and the public to protect human rights, promote health diplomacy, enhance cultural sensitivity and congruence, and reduce health disparities.

* Articulates nursing values to maintain personal integrity and the integrity of the profession.

* Integrates principles of social justice into nursing and policy.

STANDARD

DESCRIPTION

COMPETENCIES

VIII.  Culturally Congruent Practice

The registered nurse practices in a manner that is congruent with cultural diversity and inclusion principles.

* Demonstrates respect, equity, and empathy in actions and interactions with all healthcare consumers.

* Participates in life-long learning to understand cultural preferences, worldview, choices, and decision-making processes of diverse consumers.

* Creates an inventory of one’s own values, beliefs, and cultural heritage.

* Applies knowledge of variations in health beliefs, practices, and communication patterns in all nursing practice activities.

* Identifies the stage of the consumer’s acculturation and accompanying patterns of needs and engagement.

* Considers the effects and impact of discrimination and oppression on practice within and among vulnerable cultural groups.

* Uses skills and tools that are appropriately vetted for the culture, literacy, and language of the population served.

* Communicates with appropriate language and behaviors, including the use of medical interpreters and translators in accordance with consumer preferences.

* Identifies the cultural-specific meaning of interactions, terms, and content.

* Respects consumer decisions based on age, tradition, belief and family influence, and stage of acculturation.

* Advocates for policies that promote health and prevent harm among culturally diverse, under-served, or under- represented consumers.

* Promotes equal access to services, tests, interventions, health promotion programs, enrollment in research, education and other opportunities.

* Educates nurse colleagues and other professionals about cultural similarities and differences of healthcare consumers, families, groups, communities, and populations.

STANDARD

DESCRIPTION

COMPETENCIES

IX.  Communication

The registered nurse communicates effectively in all areas of practice.

* Assesses one’s own communication skills and effectiveness.

* Demonstrates cultural empathy when communicating.

* Assesses communication ability, health literacy, resources, and preferences of healthcare consumers to inform the interprofessional team and others.

* Uses language translation resources to ensure effective communication.

* Incorporates appropriate alternative strategies to communicate effectively with healthcare consumers who have visual, speech, language, or communication difficulties.

* Uses communication styles and methods that demonstrate caring, respect, deep listening, authenticity, and trust.

* Conveys accurate information.

* Maintains communication with interprofessional team and others to facilitate safe transitions and continuity in care delivery.

* Contributes the nursing perspective in interactions with others and discussions with the interprofessional team.

* Exposes care processes and decisions when they do not appear to be in the best interest of the healthcare consumer.

* Discloses concerns related to potential or actual hazards and errors in care or the practice environment to the appropriate level.

* Demonstrates continuous improvement of communication skills.

X.  Collaboration

The registered nurse collaborates with the healthcare consumer and other key stakeholders in the conduct of nursing practice.

* Identifies the areas of expertise and contribution of other professionals and key stakeholders.

* Clearly articulates the nurse’s role and responsibilities within the team.

* Uses the unique and complimentary abilities of all members of the team to optimize attainment of desired outcomes.

* Partners with the healthcare consumer and key stakeholders to advocate for and effect changes, leading to positive outcomes and quality care.

* Uses appropriate tools and techniques, including information systems and technologies, to facilitate discussion and team functions, in a manner that protects dignity, respect, privacy, and confidentiality.

* Promotes engagement through consensus building and conflict management.

* Uses effective group dynamics and strategies to enhance team performance.

* Exhibits dignity and respect when interacting with others and giving and receiving feedback.

* Partners with all stakeholders to create, implement, and evaluate a comprehensive plan.

XI.  Leadership

The registered nurse leads within the professional practice setting and the profession.

* Contributes to the establishment of an environment that supports and maintains respect, trust, and dignity.

* Encourages innovation in practice and role performance to attain personal and professional plans, goals, and vision.

* Communicates to manage change and address conflict.

* Mentors colleagues for the advancement of nursing practice and the profession to enhance safe, quality health care.

* Retains accountability for delegated nursing care.

* Contributes to the evolution of the profession through participation in professional organizations.

* Influences policy to promote health.

STANDARD

DESCRIPTION

COMPETENCIES

XII.  Education

The registered nurse seeks knowledge and competence that reflects current nursing practice and promotes futuristic thinking.

* Identifies learning needs based on nursing knowledge and the various roles the nurse may assume.

* Participates in ongoing educational activities related to nursing and interprofessional knowledge bases and professional topics.

* Mentors nurses new to their roles for the purpose of ensuring successful enculturation, orientation, and emotional support.

* Demonstrates a commitment to lifelong learning through self-reflection and inquiry for learning and personal growth.

* Seeks experiences that reflect current practice to maintain and advance knowledge, skills, abilities, attitudes, and judgment in clinical practice or role performance.

* Acquires knowledge and skills relative to the role, population, specialty, setting, and global or local health situation.

* Participates in formal consultations or informal discussions to address issues in nursing practice as an application of education and knowledge.

* Identifies modifications or accommodations needed in the delivery of education based on healthcare consumer and family members’ needs.

* Shares educational findings, experiences, and ideas with peers.

* Supports acculturation of nurses new to their roles by role modeling, encouraging, and sharing pertinent information relative to optimal care delivery.

* Facilitates a work environment supportive of ongoing education of healthcare professionals.

* Maintains a professional portfolio that provides evidence of individual competence and lifelong learning.

XIII.  Evidence-based Practice and Research

The registered nurse integrates evidence and research findings into practice.

* Articulates the values of research and its application relative to the healthcare setting and practice.

* Identifies questions in the healthcare setting and practice that can be answered by nursing research.

* Uses current evidence-based knowledge, including research findings, to guide practice

* Incorporates evidence when initiating changes in nursing practice.

* Participates in the formulation of evidence-based practice through research.

* Promotes ethical principles of research in practice and the healthcare setting.

* Appraises nursing research for optimal application in practice and the healthcare setting.

* Shares peer-reviewed research findings with colleagues to integrate knowledge into nursing practice.

 

STANDARD

DESCRIPTION

COMPETENCIES

XIV.  Quality of Practice

The registered nurse contributes to quality nursing practice.

* Ensures that nursing practice is safe, effective, efficient, equitable, timely, and patient-centered (IOM, 1999; IOM, 2001).

* Identifies barriers and opportunities to improve healthcare safety, effectiveness, efficiency, equitability, timeliness, and patient-centeredness.

* Recommends strategies to improve nursing quality.

* Uses creativity and innovation to enhance nursing care.

* Participates in quality improvement initiatives.

* Collects data to monitor the quality of nursing practice.

* Contributes in efforts to improve healthcare efficiency.

* Provides critical review and/or evaluation of policies, procedures, and guidelines to improve the quality of health care.

* Engages in formal and informal peer review processes.

* Collaborates with the interprofessional team to implement quality improvement plans and interventions.

* Documents nursing practice in a manner that supports quality and performance improvement initiatives.

* Achieves professional certification, when available.

 

XV.  Professional Practice Evaluation

The registered nurse evaluates one’s own and others’ nursing practice.

* Engages in self-reflection and self- evaluation of nursing practice on a regular basis, identifying areas of strength as well as areas in which professional growth would be beneficial.

* Adheres to the guidance about professional practice as specified in the Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice and the Code of Ethics for Nurses with Interpretive Statements.

* Ensures that nursing practice is consistent with regulatory requirements pertaining to licensure, relevant statutes, rules, and regulations.

* Uses organizational policies and procedures to guide professional practice.

* Influences organizational policies and procedures to promote interprofessional evidence-based practice.

* Provides evidence for practice decisions and actions as part of the formal and informal evaluation processes.

* Seeks formal and informal feedback regarding one’s own practice from healthcare consumers, peers, colleagues, supervisors, and others.

* Provides peers and others with formal and informal constructive feedback regarding their practice or role performance.

* Takes action to achieve goals identified during the evaluation process.

 

Standards

Description

Competencies

XVI.  Resource Utilization

The registered nurse utilizes appropriate resources to plan, provide, and sustain evidence-based nursing services that are safe, effective, and fiscally responsible.

* Assesses healthcare consumer care needs and resources available to achieve desired outcomes.

* Assists the healthcare consumer in factoring costs, risks, and benefits in decisions about care.

* Assists the healthcare consumer in identifying and securing appropriate services to address needs across the healthcare continuum.

* Delegates in accordance with applicable legal and policy parameters.

* Identifies impact of resource allocation on the potential for harm, complexity of the task, and desired outcomes.

* Advocates for resources that support and enhance nursing practice.

* Integrates telehealth and mobile health technologies into practice to promote positive interactions between healthcare consumers and care providers.

* Uses organizational and community resources to implement interprofessional plans.

* Addresses discriminatory healthcare practices and the impact on resource allocation.

XVII.  Environmental Health

The registered nurse practices in an environmentally safe and healthy manner.

* Promotes a safe and healthy workplace and professional practice environment.

* Uses environmental health concepts in practice.

* Assesses the environment to identify risk factors.

* Reduces environmental health risks to self, colleagues, and healthcare consumers.

* Communicates information about environmental health risks and exposure reduction strategies.

* Advocates for the safe, judicious, and appropriate use and disposal of products in health care.

* Incorporates technologies to promote safe practice environments.

* Uses products or treatments consistent with evidence-based practice to reduce environmental threats.

* Participates in developing strategies to promote healthy communities and practice environments.

(American Nurses Association. Nursing: Scopes and Standards of Practice, 3rd. Ed. 2015. pp. 53-84.)

 

APPENDIX B

  THE CODE OF ETHICS FOR NURSES

The purpose of the Code of Ethics for Nurses:

  • “It is a succinct statement of the ethical values, obligations, duties, and professional ideals of nurses individually and collectively.”
  • “It is the profession’s nonnegotiable ethical standard.”
  • “It is an expression of nursing’s own understanding of its commitment to society.”

Provision 1

The nurse practices with compassion and respect for the inherent dignity, worth, and personal attributes of every person, without prejudice.

Provision 2

The nurse’s primary commitment is to the patient, whether an individual, family, group community, or problems.

Provision 3

The nurse promotes, advocates for, and protects the rights, health and safety of the patient.

Provision 4

The nurse has authority, accountability, and responsibility for nursing practice, makes decisions, and takes action consistent with the obligation to provide optimal care.

Provision 5

The nurse owes the same duties to self as to others, including the responsibility to promote health and safety, preserve wholeness of character and integrity, maintain competence, and continue personal and professional growth.

Provision 6

The nurse, through individual and collective action, establishes, maintains, and improves the moral environment of the work setting and the conditions of employment, conducive to quality health care.

Provision 7

The nurse, whether in research, practice, education, or administration, contributes to the advancement of the profession through research and scholarly inquiry, professional standards development, and generation of nursing and health policies.

Provision 8

The nurse collaborates with other health professionals and the public to protect and promote human rights, health diplomacy, and health initiatives.

Provision 9

The profession of nursing, collectively through its professional organizations, must articulate nursing values, maintain the integrity of the profession, and integrate principles of social justice into nursing and health policy.

(Taken from American Nurses Association.  The Code of Ethics for Nurses with Interpretive Statements, 2014).