College to Host MLK Events

Posted on: Monday, January 8th, 2018 by Brent Treash
Break the Silence. Be the Change. is the theme for the weeklong celebration addressing the many ways in which race, gender, religion, socio-economic status, geographical location and sexual identity define the various levels of privilege that we have and how the privilege of one group often means oppression for others.

Dr. Bettina Love, award-winning author and associate professor of educational theory and practice at the University of Georgia will present a keynote address as part of Emory & Henry College’s celebration of the life and legacy of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The free, public talk will take place on Monday, Jan. 15, at 9:30 a.m. at the Kennedy~Reedy Theatre in the McGlothlin Center for Arts, 30481 Garnand Drive, Emory, Va.

Break the Silence. Be the Change. is the theme for the weeklong celebration addressing the many ways in which race, gender, religion, socio-economic status, geographical location and sexual identity define the various levels of privilege that we have and how the privilege of one group often means oppression for others.

Love’s research focuses on the ways in which urban youth negotiate hip-hop music and culture to form social, cultural and political identities to create new and sustainable ways of thinking about urban education and social justice. Her research also focuses on how teachers and schools working with parents and communities can build communal, civically engaged, anti-racist, anti-homophobic, and anti-sexist educational, equitable classrooms.

Breakout sessions will take place in the afternoon following the keynote address at various locations across the E&H campus. The sessions will be conducted by a variety of experts from among the E&H faculty and staff, as well as off-campus guest speakers.

At 2:30 p.m., Love will lead an open conversation with the audience on the topic Recognizing Privilege Isn't Enough: Talking About the Real Work in Wiley Auditorium, 30461 Garnand Drive, Emory, Va.

Full List of Events

The seven-day series of events is open to the public and free of charge. For more information contact Mary K. Briggs, College Chaplain, at \APQYzg68GmH.E|n]#[J&/DCbO*S&V'7%ad.

Related events held throughout the week are:

Student Forum: “If You really knew me...”
In the style of the MTV television series "If You Really Knew Me" (which focuses on youth subculture and different cliques in high schools), this interactive event will challenge stereotypes and help unite members of the student body. Participants will be assigned to a group where they will be given the opportunity to reveal something personal about themselves within the context of the 2018 MLK Day theme. The forum will take place on Tuesday, Jan. 9 at 7:30 p.m. in the Martin Brock Gymnasium.

Interfaith Prayer Service
The Association for Religious Diversity is partnering with the MLK planning team to present an interfaith prayer service from the context of several world religions on Wednesday, Jan. 10 at 7:30 p.m. in Memorial Chapel. Focusing on the ideals of Dr. King’s dream for all people to live in a world without privilege, where no one is oppressed and everyone is equal, the E&H community will be challenged to become a place of sanctuary for everyone.

Reynolds Lectureship: Dr. Michael Nickens
Nickens is a tremendous tuba player and is the nationally-known founder and director of The Green Machine, George Mason University's award-winning Pep Band. His lecture-recital will take place on Thursday, Jan. 11 at 7:30 p.m. in the Kennedy~Reedy Theatre in the McGlothlin Center for the Arts, 30481 Garnand Drive, Emory, Va. The concert will include solo works for tuba with emphasis on free improvisation and audience participation, and Nickens will discuss the value of musical exploration as a means of racial and cultural identity. The public is invited to attend free of charge.

Movie Screening: Hidden Figures
Spiritual Life group Real Reel will host a screening of Hidden Figures on Friday, Jan. 12 at 5:30 p.m. in Wiley Auditorium. The film focuses on three brilliant African-American women at NASA who served as the brains behind one of the greatest operations in history: the launch of astronaut John Glenn into orbit. This is a true story of how three women of color, who were more than qualified to do the work, were treated in the workplace by their white superiors. Free pizza will be served before the movie screening. A talkback will follow.

Tunnel of Oppression Interactive Installation
The Tunnel of Oppression is an interactive installation meant to be experienced in small groups. It offers interactive, experiential vignettes of different types of oppression, including issues of race, class, gender and environmental degradation. Participants will have the opportunity to discuss their experiences and ways they can be part of the solution. The journey will take approximately one hour and the first group will begin Sunday, Jan. 14 at 6 p.m. in the Mason Fellowship Hall in Memorial Chapel. Because of time limitations, participants arriving after 8:30 p.m. will not be admitted to the installation.


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