Clubs & Organizations

Emory & Henry College has approximately 70 active student clubs and organizations so you can stay connected—even outside of class.

Delta Rho Delta SororityDelta Rho Delta Sorority

Among the many student groups are active Greek Life organizations comprised of 16 active local social fraternities and sororities.

Other opportunities to get involved include club sports, special interest groups, honorary societies, and spiritual life organizations.

To learn more ways you can get involved or to ask questions about specific clubs and organizations, please contact Josh von Castle, Director of Student Leadership, at jvoncastle@ehc.edu.

  • Club Sports

    Bass Fishing Club: The newest club sport at Emory & Henry offering both men’s and women’s competitive teams.  Enhance your skills and compete in national tournaments.

    Disc Golf Club: Emory & Henry sponsors Disc Golf teams for men and women. The teams will compete against other college club teams from around the region and in the National Collegiate Disc Golf Championships. The College has its own Professional Disc Golf Association Course on campus and hosts professional tournaments. 

    Outdoor Adventure TeamMembers of the Emory & Henry Adventure Team have the opportunity to receive scholarships for backpacking, climbing, paddling, and outdoor leadership. Participants will engage the Outdoor Program’s full spectrum of adventure, and they will be able to choose a specific sport in which to receive individual instruction and mentorship. Adventure Team members also have the opportunity to represent the College at conferences, regional events, and at competitions in whitewater paddling and bouldering/climbing.

    Rugby Football ClubRugby is one of the fastest growing club sports in America with more than 32,000 college players registered with USA Rugby.  Emory & Henry club is open to men and women and will compete against other college club teams from around the region in the Cardinal Athletic Conference. Coach Tom O’Neil is a certified USA Rugby Coach and played his college rugby at Appalachian State. 

  • College Student Media

    Ampersand. The student media literary and art magazine. Organized in 1957 as the “Prism” and renamed “Ampersand” in 1979. Published once a year. 

    EHC-TV. The television studio operated by the Department of Mass Communications. Programming appears on Comcast Cable, Channel 3, on Wednesdays and Thursdays at 7 p.m., including news and interviews on “Emory & Henry Reports” as well as replays of football and basketball games.

    The Sphinx. The College yearbook, published since 1907, is a student-operated media. Issued annually in the spring, the yearbook documents college life during the academic year. A variety of staff positions are open to all students, with interest particularly in page layout, writing, photography, business management, sales, and more.

    The Whitetopper. The College newspaper, first published in 1914 as The Weekly Bulletin and now one of the oldest student-produced newspapers in the South. It is a student media published weekly during the school year. 

    The Whitetopper: Student Newspaper 

    WEHC. WEHC 90.7 is the college radio station, known as “Your college and community station.” Since October 2009, the station has been broadcasting at nearly 9,000 watts, reaching a five county area in Virginia and Tennessee with its primary signal. The secondary signal reaches into parts of North Carolina. The station carries local programming in the afternoons and evenings, with a 4-6 p.m. break-in for NPR’s All Things Considered. From midnight until 1:00 p.m., the station carries Radio IQ programming that consists of NPR news and BBC talk. WEHC broadcasts football games and home basketball games. The station signal is streamed 24/7 and can be found at wehcfm.com. Students may apply to provide musical programming, sports coverage, or news by contacting General Manager: 

  • Greek Life
    Fraternities

    Beta Lambda Zeta

    Born on the steps on Stuart, Beta Lambda Zeta social fraternity has worked to instill the values of Brotherhood, Love, Loyalty and Zeal since March 6, 1927. The Lambs, as they are known on campus, work to embody the values of Mr. Al Mitchell, who was the fraternity advisor for over 40 years. The brothers continue to strive to be community leaders in student organizations such as student government, Phi Beta Lambda and several others. The Lambs are a unique group of individuals involved in a variety of majors including Business, Economics, Civic Innovation, Musical Theater and Spanish.


    C Phi C

    The purpose of this organization is to be a support group for young African American males at Emory & Henry College, and to help them maintain a positive attitude in an area that they may not be familiar with. We want to demonstrate leadership, responsibility, initiative, and enthusiasm with giving back to the community. We do not discriminate against any other races, but our main objective is to support young African American men, that is the aspect we focus on when asking new members to become a part of our brotherhood.


    Dom-I-Necher

    The newest fraternity at Emory & Henry College, the Dom-I-Nechers were re-chartered on April 19th, 2006 by a unanimous vote by the Student Senate. Eric Eteuati, Nathaniel Griffith and Gairdt Edwards are the re-founding Fathers of the fraternity. Since 1920, an Emory & Henry College tradition, DIN is the oldest fraternity on campus and is named after Saint Dominic. Our colors are red, black and white. These colors signify this brotherhood. The Dominiquer rooster is our emblem. Honesty, Dignity and Integrity are the core values of the fraternity with the motto of “leadership through individuality.” A fraternity is not dependent on size. The existing spirit is a product of its members and DIN is proud of its close brotherhood. The brothers are involved with many activities, including Student Government, study abroad programs, national honor societies, Campus Christian Fellowship, national leadership programs, intramurals, Resident Advisor and different distinguished internships. Majors range from Political Science, Mass Communications, Psychology, Business Management, Education, and History. We represent diversified interest and individuals, all managing to find time to live a little and be a close brotherhood. 


    Phi Gamma Phi

    Phi Gamma Pi is an athletic fraternity that was founded in 1928. Throughout the years, many of our brothers have become prestigious athletes and coaches. We proudly support our athletes in their intercollegiate careers as well as their intramural competitions. In addition, we have many brothers in the various clubs and organizations throughout the community. Every year we participate in different community service projects and do out best to make our presence known.

    Our brotherhood consists of knowledge, persistence, excellence, and valor. Our brothers are very proud of our traditions and beliefs that we share. Our sister sorority is Kappa Phi Alpha. As the seasons change, so do the faces but the bond and loyalty once help in 1928 is still very much alive today. 


    Phi Pi Alpha

    Phi Pi Alpha social fraternity was founded on February 19, 1921. The founding brothers of the fraternity are Dr. Earl R. Glindy, Willard Lee III, and John Wiley Perry. “Some of us are cool guys, others are smart; when we are together, we are Phi Pi at heart.”


    Pi Delta Chi

    Established in 1989, Pi Delta Chi has grown to become one of the most active social fraternities on campus. Brothers are active in Greek Council and intramural athletics and many other campus activities. Pi Delta Chi, also known as the “Ducks,” is proud to wear the fraternity’s colors of royal blue, gray, and white. We share the motto Truth, Loyalty, and Brotherhood, as represented by the scales, lion, and clenched hands on our crest.


    Sigma Alpha Kappa

    Sigma Alpha Kappa was founded in 1970 upon the foundation of our motto, “Unity through Diversity without Conformity.” Our colors are purple and white, and our mascot is Max from the children’s book, “Where the Wild Things Are.” We pride ourselves in the rich history of our brotherhood.

    Our brotherhood is a plethora of majors, personalities, and hobbies. We like to have small numbers, but every one of us can take over the room with our personalities. Like our motto states, we pride ourselves on being diverse. It’s our diversity that makes us as special as we are. Our brothers participate in Phi Eta Sigma, The Blue Key National Honors Society, are leaders in the Outdoor Program, and hold positions on the Greek Council.


    Sigma Iota

    Sigma Iota was established in 1926 by 13 original brothers with military backgrounds. This fraternity was founded upon the idea of shaping young men into leaders of the classroom, field, and community. The Fraternity’s motto is “Brotherhood ‘til Death” as its members take great pride in having a unified brotherhood. 


    Theta Chi Epsilon

    The brothers of Theta Chi Epsilon share one of the richest histories among fraternities at Emory & Henry. Our thirteen founding members began a social group that based its principles on the strength of unity and brotherhood through diversity and serving the community. We proudly wear our colors of green, white and black and have Delta Omicron Pi as our sister sorority. We don’t ask for perfection. We only ask that you strive to be the best you can be while trying to improve everyday. We push ourselves and try to get involved as much as possible. We are active in a variety of campus organizations, such as Bonner Scholars, E&H Theatre, Outdoor Leadership Program, Religious Life and many others.


    Sororities 

    Alpha Beta Chi 

    Alpha Beta Chi was founded in 1928 by a group of women in the Waterhouse dorm, making us the oldest sorority on campus. The sisters of ABX are extremely proud of our colors of red and white. We cherish the traditions of Sisterhood, Loyalty, and Friendship. The sisters participate in many extracurricular activities here on campus. Throughout the years, our members have been involved in numerous organizations on campus such as Student Government, the Whitetopper, concert choir, varsity and intramural sports, resident advisors, homecoming queens, and many other activities. Besides being involved on campus, we also hold functions each semester.

    Our favorite event during the year is always ABX Airband though. Held during the spring semester, Airband invites groups or individual students to perform a dance routine, rap, or any other talent in front of an audience. It’s a great way for everyone to relax before finals start and canned food received during the event is donated to a local food shelter! At Airband, we sponsor three scholarships: the Janie Bagan Memorial Scholarship, given to a deserving English major; the Eleanor Hutton Scholarship, awarded to a worthy female majoring in Physical Education; and the Mary-Margaret Justis Scholarship, given to a female who displays outstanding leadership.

    Our brother fraternity is Sigma Iota, the men in red and black. We often share joint activities with them, such as Bid Turn-In and various social functions.  We proudly wear our letters on every day possible. The sisters, current and alumni, cherish the closeness and love we have for each other. 


    Delta Omicron Pi

    Delta Omicron Pi was founded in 1961 by six women at the request of the Dean of Women. Our six founding members created Delta Pi with a spirit to follow the model of a national sorority. Since then, Delta Pi has built a strong tradition on Emory & Henry’s campus.

    Our goals are honesty to ourselves and others; loyalty to our sisterhood, college and community; and purity by observing the highest ideals of womanhood. Delta Pis are members of Psi Chi, Sigma Tau Delta, Phi Eta Sigma, Emory & Henry’s honors program, Emory & Henry’s marching band, various athletic teams, spiritual life groups on campus including Fellowship of Christian Athletes, debate societies, the Student Government Association, orientation, residential life on campus, and various other organizations.

    Delta Pis love to hang out together at Thursday night meetings, functions, or random gatherings wherever we happen to be. Sisters find it hard to go a day on campus without running into each other on the sidewalks or in the caf. We’ve often said (and heard it said) that Delta Pis are everywhere. Where there are Delta Pis, there is a good chance that Theta Chis are not far away. We are privileged to have called Theta Chi Epsilon our brother fraternity since our founding. Our groups enjoy joint functions, family dinners, and other unexpected events.


    Delta Rho Delta

    Delta Rho Delta was founded in 1934 by nine young women seeking to form a group representing our core principles of justice, kindness, and honor. In fact, Delta Rho is committed to upholding these values that in 1973, the sorority was turned over to the college after the sisters refused to compromise their standards in order to gain new members. In 1987, eight young women attending Emory & Henry began the process of re-founding Delta Rho Delta, and we were successfully re-founded in 1988. Represented by the colors black, white, and gold, the yellow rose, and the duck, Delta Rho Delta is also consistently represented by the diversity, involvement, and love for life found in sisters young and old. We strive to uphold our values and maintain a steady goal for the betterment of ourselves and our surrounding communities.


    Kappa Phi Alpha

    Kappa Phi Alpha was founded in the fall of 1930 by three women living in Weaver Hall. The three qualities in which the sisterhood was founded were Beauty, Love, Courage. We feel strongly about these attributes and are proud to still uphold these values within our sisterhood. The sisters are involved in various campus activities such as Student Government, cheerleading, volleyball, soccer, Intermont Equestrian team, department clubs, service and honor fraternities, student life, religious organizations, various campus publications, Blue and Gold Society, community service work, and uphold high academic standings. Among our extracurricular activities and academics we also maintain a close bond with our brothers of Phi Gamma Phi. We are proud of our relationship we have with our brothers, and strive to sustain this relationship.


    Pi Sigma Kappa 

    In 1978, four Emory & Henry women established Pi Sigma Kappa on the steps of Crowe’s Nest. These founding sisters wanted girls at Emory to have the option of joining a sorority that would never pressure them to change who they are or conform to fit a specific mold. Our sisters participate in and hold roles of leadership in a wide range of campus activities: Student Government, Bonner Scholars, Blue & Gold Society, Resident Advising, the Honors Program, the Ampersand, departmental clubs, religious organizations, and service and honor fraternities.


    Sigma Upsilon Nu

    Sigma Upsilon Nu was founded by seven women on March 22, 1985, making it the youngest sorority on campus. Our colors are black and white, a symbolization of conflicting forces working together. 

    Although we may be small, it is obvious that each sister is unique in her own way. Because of our individuality, our participation campus is widespread. Sigma Nus participate in the E&H Dance Team, Literary Societies, Alpha Psi Omega, Psi Chi, Peer Educators, Gamma Theta Upsilon, E&H Theatre, and the International Education Program.


    Zeta Phi

    Zeta Phi was chartered in 1935 with the colors green and white. In 2017 Zeta Phi was re-chartered by a group of women who value Authenticity, Bravery, and Benevolence. We were re-chartered to provide a group on campus that values women from all walks of life just as they are. Sisters of Zeta Phi are academically driven and are active members of multiple groups such as: Resident Advising, Senate, The Honors Program, Bonner Scholars, Orientation Leaders, EHC-TV, Whitetopper, and The Governing Council.

  • Honor Societies

    Alpha Psi Omega. National Honorary Theatre Society for students interested in the Theatre Arts; membership by invitation to students with an active interest in the theatre arts and are familiar with play production in areas such as directing, acting, management, musical theatre and/or design and technology.

    Beta Beta Beta. Promotes excellence and research in biology; to be eligible for full membership, students must be biology students who have at least a 3.0 GPA in their Biology courses and have completed at least three biology courses beyond BIOL117. 

    Blue Key. Junior and senior male and female students who have been of service to the College through extracurricular and academic achievements; membership by invitation. 

    Gamma Theta Upsilon. Geography students exhibiting academic excellence. Promotes interest, research, and leadership in the discipline. 

    Phi Beta Lambda.  A national business fraternity open to all students interested in accounting, business, management, economics, business law and finance. 

    Phi Eta Sigma. National honor society for first-year students. Membership is by invitation to students who have exhibited academic excellence during their first year. With more than 350 chapters nationally, Phi Eta Sigma’s purpose is to recognize superior academic achievement and provide scholarship opportunities to talented students.

    Pi Delta Phi. French Honor Society. The purpose is to recognize outstanding scholarship in the French language and its literatures, to increase the knowledge and appreciation of Americans for the cultural contributions of the French-speaking world, and to stimulate and encourage French and francophone cultural activities. 

    Pi Gamma Mu. Social science students who have maintained a high scholastic average and meet membership requirements. Sponsors service projects and speakers from social science fields. 

    Pi Sigma Alpha. A national political science honor society founded in 1920 at the University of Texas for upper-level undergraduate students. 

    Psi Chi.  An International Honor Society in Psychology, founded in 1929 for the purposes of encouraging, stimulating, and maintaining excellence in scholarship and advancing the science of psychology. Open to all students who meet the national criteria. 

    Sigma Delta Pi. Spanish National Honor Society. Honors, encourages, and fosters excellence in the study of Spanish. Promotes respect for the culture of Spanish-speaking peoples. 

    Sigma Mu. Senior students ranked academically in the upper one-tenth of their class and junior students ranked in the upper one-fifteenth of their class; membership by invitation. 

    Sigma Tau Delta. The International English Honor Society. It seeks to confer distinction for high achievement in English language and literature. The organization seeks to promote cultural stimulation on college campuses and serve society by fostering literacy. It is open to all English majors and minors meeting the national requirements. 

  • Interest Groups

    Alpha Phi Omega. Assembles men and women in the fellowship of the Scout’s Oath to develop leadership, promote friendship, and provide service to the community.

    Athletic Training Student Organization. The Athletic Training Student Organization is open to students who are planning to apply to and/or have been accepted into the Athletic Training Program. The purpose of the club is to provide athletic training students with support for the academic and clinical development.  Providing opportunities for interaction with other healthcare professionals and  support attendance at academic and professional workshops and meetings. The club strives to enhance the learning experiences for all students in the Athletic Training Program. 

    Blue & Gold Society​: A student organization that consists of tour guides who lead prospective student groups around the main campus of Emory & Henry. These “Ambassadors” provide an historical overview of Emory & Henry and explain different buildings, student organizations, academic offerings, etc. They serve the College through being positive and accurate representatives of its students, faculty, staff, and campus community. The Admissions Office entrusts them to build a positive relationship with guests so that each person has a first-class visit to the College. Activities are coordinated by Admissions staff.

    CiviCORPS (Change Organizers of Reflective Participatory Service). Each semester, CiviCORPS coordinates and facilitates multiple on-campus educational, service, and reflection events focused on current social issues (campus, local, national, global) about which E&H students care. The group’s mission is to learn, educate, reflect, and act, encouraging participatory service that addresses such issues. Members develop skills in event planning, community organizing, volunteer recruitment, and communication while bonding and having fun. The group is always looking for new members.

    College Democrats. Promotes interest and involvement in the Democratic party and its candidates in local, state, and national elections. 

    Emory & Henry College Republicans. Promotes interest and involvement in the Republican party and its candidates.

    Emory & Henry Genders and Sexualities Alliance. A social and support organization for persons of all orientations, including gay, lesbian, transgender, and bisexual, of the campus community and for their friends and allies. Membership will remain confidential.

    E&H Greens. Leads the college community toward a sustainable human habitat through conservation, educational programs, and the promotion of simple living. Students lead trips, bring in speakers and performers, and organize for change. Advisors: Dr. Shelley Koch and Dr. Ed Davis. President: Matt Reilly.

    Emory Activities Board (EAB). The Emory Activities Board (EAB) brings fun and exciting campus-wide events to the community. From concerts, formals, and lyceums to off-campus trips to regional destinations, EAB adds excitement to campus life for everyone. EAB has open membership and all students are able to join.

    Habitat for Humanity. Habitat for Humanity works with our local affiliate, Washington County Habitat for Humanity to help eliminate homelessness by helping build homes so that everyone can have a healthy, affordable place to call home. 

    Healthcare Professions Club. Advises students planning careers in the health professions, promotes interest through field trips and speakers, and sponsors visits to graduate programs in health care. 

    Hermesian Literary Society. Founded on the values are virtue, eloquence, and learning, the Hermesian Literary Society is one of the oldest debate societies on campus. The society’s goals are to promote engaged and intellectual discourse on campus on debate issues facing society today. Must be at least a second-semester freshman with a GPA of 3.4 to join.

    Math Club. The Emory & Henry Math Club places great emphasis on networking and provides opportunities to students by traveling to various conferences, bringing in guest speakers, and connecting with other regional schools. It is the hope of the club to create an ecosystem of innovation and diversity and to foster curiosity and facilitate new ideas and innovations in the mathematical community.

    Peer Education Program. A college- and community-based network affiliated with the National Bacchus Network focusing on comprehensive health and safety initiatives. Promotes student campus and community-wide leadership on healthy and safe lifestyle decisions. Offers members a national certification. Plans and promotes programs on campus such as the Sexual Assault   Education and Prevention, Red Flag Campaign, Spring Break Awareness, Depression and wellness screenings and Stress Management Fairs. Provides Bystander training and other harm reduction training. Certified peer educators lead workshops on campus. Open to all interested students. 

    Pre-Law Society. Provides programming to enrich students’ pre-professional legal skills and studies. These programs include events, such as law forums, that facilitate discussion between students and legal professionals. The Society hosts guest speakers, sponsors visits to law schools, and assists in securing internships.

    Psychology Club. Provides support and information to students who are interested in psychology-related professions through the sponsorship of events such as guest lectures and workshops on careers in psychology and how to get into graduate school. Open to all interested students. 

    Raices. Raices is a student organization serving to bring awareness, foster a sense of community for the Hispanic-Latinx students of Emory & Henry College, and promote networking among individuals of Hispanic-Latino cultural backgrounds. The name raices, meaning roots, was inspired by a Freda Kahlo painting of the same name. 

    Residence Hall Association (RHA). The Residence Hall Association is a student-run organization that caters to the students living in the residence halls on campus. The goals of RHA are to promote community among the residents and to be an active voice and representation of all students residing in the residence halls. The organization aims to provide channels for the opinions and concerns of residential students, to get students engaged and involved in campus-wide programming that RHA provides, as well as, to perform all other duties necessary to improve the campus environment for residential students.

    River’s Way. Provides an opportunity for establishing and maintaining dedicated relationships with youth and young adults with disabilities in this region. Activities include: team building programs, gardening programs, fitness programs at the Bristol Family YMCA, summer camps at Sugar Hollow Park and at Camp Ahistadi, adventure programs, and engaging members in developing workforce soft skills. 

    Sports Management Club. The purpose of this organization is to provide students majoring in Physical Education, Sports Management, and/or Teacher Preparation with enhanced educational and professional development opportunities. Members will have opportunities to attend in-service meetings and events outside of the school environment and will also be provided with additional leadership opportunities. Professional development activities will include involving members in professional organizations such as the American Alliance for Health,  Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (AAHPERD) and/or North American Society for Sport Management (NASSM).

    Strength & Conditioning Club. The Strength and Conditioning Club is here to provide students with the opportunity to become educated in fields dealing with strength and conditioning and physical fitness. Students in majors such as Exercise Science, Health and Human Performance, Physical Education, or Athletic Training will benefit greatly from the information provided in this club. There will be several opportunities to gain more education on campus and off campus. 

    Student Affiliate of the American Chemical Society. Provides students interested in the sciences with opportunities to become involved in the scientific community. Sponsors speakers, attends local ACS meetings, performs science-oriented demonstrations and tours graduate schools and local industry. Advisor: Dr. Jamie Ferguson; President: TBD.

    Student-Athlete Advisory Committee (SAAC). SAAC  is a committee made up of student-athletes assembled to provide insight on the student-athlete experience. The SAAC also offers input on the rules, regulations, and policies that affect student-athletes’ lives on NCAA member institution campuses.

    The purpose of Student-Athlete Advisory Committee is as follows:

    • To streamline and promote efficient communication between the athletic department administration and the student-athlete population.
    • To provide the student-athlete population with an opportunity to more effectively communicate with the athletic department administration and provide suggestions on programs designed to serve its needs.
    • To actively encourage more involvement of student-athletes in campus and community outreach projects.
    • To design and implement programs which will encourage academic achievement, health promotion, social responsibility, and general life skills awareness.
  • Performing Groups

    Opportunities are available in theatre, voice, and instrumental music. In all areas, provisions are made to accommodate students who have had prior experience and training, as well as those individuals who may be venturing into the performing arts for the first time. All areas, except dance, have options for formal academic training and academic credit related to practice and/or performance.

    Choral Ensembles. Emory & Henry College offers choral performance opportunities for all students interested in singing. Ensembles include Concert Choir and Chamber Singers. Concert Choir, which is open to all students, typically has 40-50 singers and performs 2-3 concerts per semester including an annual tour. 

    Instrumental Ensembles. Brass Quintet, Brass Choir, Marching Band, Trumpet Ensemble, Woodwind Ensemble, and Symphonic Band are available to majors and non-majors who have prior experience on an instrument, depending upon interest and numbers. Rehearsals and performances at campus events. 

    Marching Band.  Students with marching band experience either as musicians or color guard are welcome to join the marching band.  The band rehearses two to three times per week as needed to prepare for the next game. The music consists of popular marching band repertoire. 

    Theatre. The theatre department presents four major theatrical productions plus a number of student-directed showcases every year. Productions offer opportunities for students to gain experience in acting, directing, design, and backstage work. Auditions for all shows are open to all E&H students. Auditions for plays are announced on flyers across campus and in the E&H Scoop newsletter and are normally held at the beginning of each semester.

  • Spiritual Life

     

    Association for Religious Diversity (ARD) is a student-run organization that strives to make the issues of religious equality in the world known to the student body of the college. ARD also strives to diversify the religious interactions of the average student at EHC and to promote inter-religious understanding and acceptance through varied events and discussions. Any and all religious and spiritual paths are welcome, even people who simply want to learn what is out there.

    Campus Christian Fellowship (CCF) offers a time for students to share a meal, followed by a program, which often includes a guest speaker, games, and service projects. CCF meets on Tuesday evenings in the Mason Fellowship Hall in the Chapel. New members are always welcome.

    Encounter is a student-led worship gathering on Monday evening. A praise band comprised of students leads music weekly. The informal setting also includes prayer, Scripture, and witness. Participants are invited to encounter the love of God as they seek to live out their faith on campus and beyond.

    Expedition is a discussion group for people who want to grapple with tough questions regarding Christianity and the Bible. Through close fellowship with peers and religious leaders from the area, Expedition seeks to help students better understand the religious beliefs both of themselves and of others. The cornerstone belief of Expedition is that community and understanding pave the way on “The Quest for Common Ground.”

    Fellowship of Christian Athletes is open to athletes and non-athletes alike. Participants gather weekly at lunchtime. Group members lead devotions, share concerns, and encourage one another “to meet the challenge and adventure of following Christ.”

    Kerygma is a group of students who are intentionally seeking to discern God’s call in their lives. Some feel called to a professional vocation in the church, while others are discerning more generally God’s plan for their lives. Kerygma members sponsor and lead discussion groups and retreats for the campus community in order to help shape Christians into stronger leaders.

    Reel Real is a Spiritual Life Program sponsored by Expedition with the intention of expanding our spiritual understanding through film. Reel Real meets on Friday evening at 5:30 in the Chapel for dinner followed by movie discussion. The program is open to people of all faiths and traditions..

    Spiritual Life Housing is part of the College’s Theme House program. Damer, a co-ed house, provides a Christian atmosphere in which members of the community live according to a covenant that focuses on prayer, Bible study, Christian fellowship, and hospitality to the wider campus community.

    Spring Break Study Abroad: Cross Cultural Christian Mission - a spring semester study abroad class focusing on cross cultural Christian mission will include a travel component in a country such as the Dominican Republic during spring break 2016. The experience will include mission work and cultural education. 

  • Student Government Association

    Students at Emory & Henry have a long and proud history of involvement in the governance of the College. The Student Government is composed of executive, legislative, and judicial branches. The executive branch is led by the Student Body President. The Executive Branch is charged with administering all of the functions of the Student Government. The President is assisted by a group of cabinet officers, charged with administering one of the six principal departments of Student Government. These include the Office on Judicial/Honor Affairs, the Office of the Student Body Treasurer, the Office of the Elections Commissioner, the Office of the Student Government Public Relations, Office of Administrative Affairs, and the Office of Campus Activities. Each of these departments is headed by an officer appointed by the Student Body President.